Ohio moss

Ohio moss DEFAULT

Common Ohio Mosses
Photographs and Descriptions

 

This is a gallery of mostly common, and a few not so common, Ohio mosses. The thumbnails lead to individual species account pages. These pages, constructed by OMLA members Bob Klips (photos) and Diane Lucas (descriptions), show the general aspect, and in some instances microscopic leaf features, of just over 100 of the approximately 420 species reported to occur in the state. Each page’s text includes identification features, and habitat/substrate information, along with dot maps from the Ohio Moss Atlas showing which counties the mosses have been observed in. We hope you find this educational and enjoyable.

Click on a thumbnail to navigate to pages with larger images and additional information.

Amblystegium varium

Amblystegium
varium

Anacamptodon splachnoides

Anacamptodon
splachnoides

Anomodon attenuatus

Anomodon
attenuatus

Anomodon minor

Anomodon
minor

Anomodon rostratus

Anomodon
rostratus

Aphanorrhegma serratum

Aphanorrhegma
serratum

Atrichum altecristatum

Atrichum
altecristatum

Atrichum angustatum

Atrichum
angustatum

Aulacomnium heterostichum

Aulacomnium
heterostichum

Aulacomnium palustre

Aulacomnium
palustre

Barbula unguiculata

Barbula
unguiculata

Bartramia pomiformis

Bartramia
pomiformis

Brothera leana

Brothera
leana

Brotherella recurvans

Brotherella
recurvans

Bruchia flexuosa

Bruchia
flexuosa

Bryhnia graminicolor

Bryhnia
graminicolor

Bryoandersonia illecebra

Bryoandersonia
illecebra

Bryoxiphium norvegicum

Bryoxiphium
norvegicum

Bryum argenteum

Bryum
argenteum

Bryum caespiticium

Bryum
caespiticium

Bryum flaccidum

Bryum
flaccidum

Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum

Bryum lisae
var. cuspidatum

Bryum pseudotriquetrum

Bryum
pseudotriquetrum

Callicladium haldanium

Callicladium
haldanianum

Campylium chrysophyllum

Campylium
chrysophyllum

Campylium stellatum

Campylium
stellatum

Ceratodon purpureus

Ceratodon
purpureus

Climacium americanum

Climacium
americanum

Ctenedium molluscum

Ctenidium
molluscum

Cyrto-hypnum pygmaeum

Cyrto-hypnum
pygmaeum

Diphyscium foliosum

Diphyscium
foliosum

Dicranella heteromalla

Dicranella
heteromalla

Dicranum flagellare

Dicranum
flagellare

Dicranum fulvum

Dicranum
fulvum

Dicranum montanum

Dicranum
montanum

Dicranum polysetum

Dicranum
polysetum

Dicranum scoparium

Dicranum
scoparium

Dicranum spurium

Dicranum
spurium

Ditrichum pallidum

Ditrichum
pallidum

Drepanocladus aduncus

Drepanocladus
aduncus

Entodon sedictrix

Entodon
seductrix

Ephemerum cohaerens

Ephemerum
cohaerens

Eurhynchium hians

Eurhynchium
hians

Fissidens adianthoides

Fissidens
adianthoides

Fissidens bryoides

Fissidens
bryoides

Fissidens obtusifolius

Fissidens
obtusifolius

Fissidens subbasilaris

Fissidens
subbasilaris

Fissidens taxifolius

Fissidens
taxifolius

Funaria hygrometrica

Funaria
hygrometrica

Gynmostomum aeruginosum

Gymnostomum
aeruginosum

Haplocladium virginianum

Haplocladium
virginianum

Haplohymenium triste

Haplohymenium
triste

Helodium paludosum

Helodium
paludosum

Homalotheciella subcapillata

Homalotheciella
subcapillata

Homomallium adnatum

Homomallium
adnatum

Hyophila involuta

Hyophila
involuta

Hypnum curvifolium

Hypnum
curvifolium

Hypnum imponens

Hypnum
imponens

Hypnum lindbergii

Hypnum
lindbergii

Leskea gracilescens

Leskea
gracilescens

Leucobryum glaucum

Leucobryum
glaucum

Leucodon julaceus

Leucodon
julaceus

Lindbergia brachyptera

Lindbergia
brachyptera

Loeskeobryum brevirostre

Loeskeobryum
brevirostre

Mnium hornum

Mnium
hornum

Orthotrichum pumilum

Orthotrichum
pumilum

Orthotrichum strangulatum

Orthotrichum
strangulatum

Philonotis fontana

Philonotis
fontana

Philonotis marchica

Philonotis
marchica

Physcomitrium collenchymatum

Physcomitrium
collenchymatum

Physcomitrium pyriforme

Physcomitrium
pyriforme

Plagiomnium ciliare

Plagiomnium
ciliare

Plagiomnium cuspidatum

Plagiomnium
cuspidatum

Plagiomnium medium

Plagiomnium
medium

Plagiothecium cavifolium

Plagiothecium
cavifolium

Plagiothecium denticulatum

Plagiothecium
denticulatum

Platydictya confervoides medium

Platydictya
confervoides

Platygyrium repens

Platygyrium
repens

Pleuridium subulatum

Pleuridium
subulatum

Pleurozium schreberi

Pleurozium
schreberi

Pogonatum pensylvanicum

Pogonatum
pensylvanicum

Pohlia nutans

Pohlia
nutans

Polytrichastrum ohioense

Polytrichastrum
ohioense

Polytrichum commune

Polytrichum
commune

Polytrichum juniperinum

Polytrichum
juniperinum

Polytrichum piliferum

Polytrichum
piliferum

Ptilium crista-castrensis

Ptilium
crista-castrensis

Pylaisiadelpha tenuirostris

Pylaisiadelpha
tenuirostris

Rhizomnium punctatum

Rhizomnium
punctatum

Rhodobryum ontariense

Rhodobryum
ontariense

Rhynchostegium serrulatum

Rhynchostegium
serrulatum

Schistidium apocarpum

Schistidium
apocarpum

Sphagnum fimbriatum

Sphagnum
fimbriatum

Sphangum lescurii

Sphagnum
lescurii

Sphagnum palustre

Sphagnum
palustre

Syntrichia laevipila

Syntrichia
laevipila

Syntrichia papillosa

Syntrichia
papillosa

Taxiphyllum deplanatum

Taxiphyllum
deplanatum

Taxiphyllum taxirameum

Taxiphyllum
taxirameum

Tetraphis pellucida

Tetraphis
pellucida

Thelia asprella

Thelia
asprella

Thuidium delicatulum

Thuidium
delicatulum

Tortella humilis

Tortella
humilis

Tortella tortuosa

Tortella
tortuosa

Tortula acaulon

Tortula
acaulon

Tortula obtusifolia

Tortula
obtusifolia

Tortula porteri

Tortula
porteri

Tortula truncata

Tortula
truncata

Trematodon longicollis

Trematodon
longicollis

Trichostomum

Trichostomum
tenuirostre

Ulota crispa

Ulota
crispa

Ulota hutchinsiae

Ulota
hutchinsiae

Weissia controversa

Weissia
controversa

Weissia muhlenbergiana

Weissia
muhlenbergiana

Sours: https://ohiomosslichen.org/moss-photos/

Welcome to the website of the
Ohio Moss and Lichen Association

The Ohio Moss and Lichen Association (OMLA) is an informal group of people interested in the study of “cryptogams.”
For more information about our forays, visit the UPCOMING FORAYS page.

OMLA 2021 Fall Foray, September 24-25
to Lake County
See “Forays” page for details.

 An Interactive Image of a Limestone Fence
-click to see closeups-

LIMESTONE WALL

Physconia detersa

"bottlebrush frost lichen"

Candelaria concolor

"elfin candleflame lichen"

Physconia detersa

"bottlebrush frost lichen"

Physciella chloantha

Physciella chloantha

Schistidium rivulare

Flavoplaca citrina and Myriolecis dispersa

"mealy firedot lichen" and "mortar rim lichen"

Physconia detersa

"bottlebrush frost lichen"

Phaeophyscia hirsuta

Phaeophyscia hirsuta

Schistidium rivulare

Phaeophyscia and Schistidium

"shadow lichen" and "bloom moss"

Physconia detersa

"bottlebrush frost lichen"

Physconia detersa

"bottlebrush frost lichen"

Schistidium rivulare

Candelaria concolor

"elfin candleflame lichen"

Phaeophyscia hirsuta

Lichen Guide Published by
Ohio Division of Wildlife

Lichen Guide Cover

In mid-March, 2015, the Ohio Division of Wildlife published “Common Lichens of Ohio,” an 80-page booklet authored by OMLA co-founder Ray Showman, who is also the co-author of The Macrolichens of Ohio (2004). This is the 15th in a series of ODW nature guides, and the first such guide to focus on non-animal wildlife. While the heart of the booklet is descriptions of 56 lichen species, accompanied by photos contributed by several different OMLA members, it also includes material on lichen structure and reproduction, along with numerous descriptions of lichen and animal interactions. There is a brief essay entitled “Lichens, Moths and Bats” by Dr. David Wagner, the author of “Caterpillars of North America.”

The guide is free, and can be obtained (along with all the other ODW identification guides) at the ODW District 1 (Central Ohio) office at 1500 Dublin Road Columbus, Ohio 43215, or by calling 1-800-WILDLIFE. Additional  contact info for ODW including an e-mail address that will probably also work for requests, can be accessed HERE (link).

 

……………………………………………………

OMLA sponsors illustration in Flora of North America

The Flora of North America Editorial Committee offered bryologists the opportunity to help defray publication costs by sponsoring illustrations for volume 27 or volume 28 of FNA. These are the two moss volumes, of which 27 was completed in 2007, 28 will appeared about mid 2014. Individuals and organizations sponsored one or more drawings, at a modest financial cost. Sponsors have their names acknowledged in the introductory chapter of Volume 28. OMLA has chosen to sponsor Ohio haircap moss, Polytrichastrum ohioense, the only illustrated taxon with “Ohio” in its name. We’re pleased to be able to help with such a worthy endeavor, and aqre enjoying seeing and using the new volume.

OMLA-sponsored illustration in Flora of North America

OMLA-sponsored illustration in Flora of North America

OMLA was born from an organizational meeting of a number of naturalists and professional educators held in June, 2004 at the Gorman Nature Center.

OMLA founders at Gorman Nature Center June 2004

Founders meeting of OMLA at Gorman Nature Center in June, 2004.

Goals of the association include encouraging amateur and academic students in study of these organisms, expanding the knowledge of lichen and bryophyte distributions in Ohio, and gaining a better understanding of rare lichens and bryophytes in Ohio.

OMLA pursues these goals through workshops and field trips (forays). The first Fall Foray was a two-day field trip to the Edge of Appalachia preserve system in Adams County (October, 2004). This was such a success that one member asked “So what are we doing next weekend?” It was decided to have a two-day foray every fall. OMLA also does one-day forays.

The First OMLA Foray: Edge of Appalachia in October, 2004.

Ten years later at The Edge of Appalachia. October, 2014.

Ten years later at The Edge of Appalachia. October, 2014.

Sunday morning at Straight Creek Preserve, Pike County, Ohio.

Ten years later at Strait Creek Preserve, Pike County, Ohio. October, 2014.

Sours: https://ohiomosslichen.org/
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   Sphagnum lescurii

Sphagnum lescurii photo by Bob Klips

Sphagnum lescurii and Thuidium sp. on sandstone ledge in acidic woodland.
Jackson County, Ohio. October 2, 2009.

Sphagnum lescurii photo by Bob Klips

Sandstone ledge with Sphagnum lescurii in acidic woodland.
Jackson County, Ohio. October 2, 2009.

How to recognize Sphagnum lescurii: Sphagnum is recognizable as a genus because of its unique appearance. These mosses grow vertically, generally in a clump, carpet or hummock, with a round fuzzy pompon. This pompom or “capitulum” consists of a closely packed group of little beginning branches which will elongate as the stem grows upward. A group of branches will be clustered together in a single fascicle on the stem. A few of these branches will be divergent and will spread outwards from the stem, while others will be pendant and be very close to the stem. The stem and branch leaves usually differ in shape, but both grow with long thin chlorophyllose cells separating larger hyaline cells with pores, which allows for easy entry of water. A compound microscope and dissection of leaves and stem and branches of the plants are needed to make Sphagnum identifications accurately. This species is found in section Subsecundum of Sphagnum, which has row of tiny pores on the hyaline cells just adjacent to where these cells meet the green cells in the leaves on the convex back side of the branch leaves. Then details of the stem and stem leaves are used to determine the species of the moss. These features also vary depending on the habitat and moisture.

Where to find Sphagnum lescurii: This species is found in many different habitats from places intermittently wet and dry, open or shaded, in wetlands and on seepage rocks both acidic and basic.

Sphagnum-lescurii-simplemap

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Sours: https://ohiomosslichen.org/moss-sphagnum-lescurii/
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