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Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche is an award-winning teacher of financial empowerment and is quickly becoming America’s favorite personal financial educator. In 2014, Tiffany founded the Dream Catcher Community, a virtual community of over 650,000 thousand women from 100+ countries. She is the author of five #1 Amazon bestsellers, The One Week Budget and Live Richer Challenge. Her financial advice has been featured in The New York Times, Reuters, the TODAY show, PBS, TIME, ESSENCE Magazine, Forbes and many more! n this episode you’ll hear Tiffany’s story and learn how she went from a perfect credit score with money in the bank, to losing a home and being over $300,000 in debt, to building a multi-million dollar business and being one of the most popular financial literacy influencers of our time.

  • “There is no such thing as a small financial choice.” – The Budgetnista
  • Tiffany grew up in a family that discussed money in an honest and open way. Her father was a CFO and an accountant.
  • The first real-world experience Tiffany had with money was when she wanted a bike for her 10th birthday. Her dad sat her down and showed her the families’ budget.
  • Before you can teach your family about being financially literate, you have to learn yourself. You can’t teach or preach what you don’t know.
  • Tiffany set up a piggybank on Amazon for her daughter. The money gets split up into savings/investing, giving/spending. SuperGirl understands that when she gets any money it must go into one of these categories.
  • The best way to get a friend or family member to open up about financial talk is to talk about yourself first and let them know where you’ve been struggling with your budget.
  • If there are no in person financial resources groups in your neighborhood or within your circle of influence, start with online groups. It can sometimes be easier to discuss your financial struggles in forums and chat groups.
  • Your success is tied to the sum of the five people you hang out with most. Remember, Tiffany originally saved $40,000 while only making $40,000 a year because saving and budgeting was a priority.
  • Relationships are everything. There are some doors that cannot be opened from the outside. It doesn’t matter how smart you are or how hard you work. You can only get in by somebody opening the door. -Tiffany breaks her friends into three groups: Peers, Mentors and Mentee’s.
  • Before some of Tiffany’s major successes in business, she fell victim to an investment scam, overcame foreclosing on her house and had to pay off more than $300,000 in debt.
  • Take responsibility for your poor financial decisions.
  • One of the best ways to figure out your career path is to volunteer.
  • You subconsciously act on your passions everyday and gravitate towards things you like to do. Become aware of this and parlay it into a career path.
  • If you have an idea for a business that doesn’t already exist. Don’t start it. Instead find a niche within an already existing industry and master it.
  • Don’t forget where you came from, financially and mentally. Even after “making it,” Tiffany continues to follow the financial principles that got her to where she is today. For example, she kept her wedding reasonable, only spending $2,500 while saving up to pay cash for her dream home.
  • After you’ve “made it,” pay it forward with your friends, family, and employees. When you do well, bring other people up with you.

The Takeaway: Take responsibility for your finances, build your network, and pay it forward.

Tiffany Aliche on Social Media:

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Sours: https://paychecksandbalances.com/pb102-the-budgetnista/

Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche, is an award-winning teacher of financial education and is quickly becoming America’s favorite, personal financial educator. The Budgetnista is also an Amazon #1 bestselling author of The One Week Budget and the Live Richer Challenge series. Through her company, The Budgetnista, Tiffany has created a financial movement that has helped over 1 million women worldwide collectively save more than $200 million, and pay off over $100 million in debt, purchase homes and transform the way they think about their finances. These women that participate in this global movement call themselves, Dream Catchers. Tiffany credits her experience as a preschool teacher for 10 years in Newark, NJ for defining her purpose behind The Budgetnista…education. In 2019, Tiffany transformed her commitment into legislation when she partnered with Assemblywoman Angela V. McKnight to write a bill that was later signed into Law A1414 (The Budgetnista Law). This law made it mandatory for financial education to be integrated into all middle schools in New Jersey. To further her mission Tiffany has created and teaches numerous financial classes both online and in person. Her signature course is her annual, Live Richer Challenge with over 900,000 women participating in one or more of her Challenges. She also blogs about personal finance for The Huffington Post and The Budgetnista Blog, co-hosts an award-winning podcast, Brown Ambition and has an online school, the Live Richer Academy that teaches women how to create, implement and automate their own financial education path. The Budgetnista and her financial advice have been featured on Good Morning America, the TODAY show, PBS, TIME, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Reuters, ESSENCE Magazine, FORBES, Fox Business, MSNBC, CNN/HLN. She is also the featured financial expert for the popular daytime talk show, The Real.

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Sours: https://www.audible.com/author/Tiffany-The-Budgetnista-Aliche/B007054EVE
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Live Richer with Tiffany “the Budgetnista” Aliche

Tiffany Aliche—or “the Budgetnista”—shares her top tips for maximizing your money, preparing for unexpected financial hardships, and the least-scary ways to raise your net worth.

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This Month’s Guest:

TIFFANY ALICHE, also known as “The Budgetnista,” is quickly becoming America’s favorite personal financial educator. The Budgetnista is the founder of the LIVE RICHER Challenge. Since 2008, Aliche has specialized in the delivery of financial education that includes seminars, workshops, curricula, and trainings. She is the best-selling author of the books The One Week Budget and Live Richer Challenge (number one on Amazon in budgeting). She and her financial advice have been featured on Good Morning America, the TODAY Show, PBS, Time, The New York Times, Reuters, ESSENCE magazine, Forbes, Fox Business, MSNBC, and CBS MoneyWatch. She also blogs about personal finance for The Huffington Post and U.S. News and World Report. @thebudgetnista

 

Additional Resources:

 

 

Transcript from Our Conversation with Tiffany Aliche – “The Budgetnista”

Lisa Bennett (CFW): Tiffany Aliche, better known as the Budgetnista, is one of America’s favorite personal financial educators. And she’s one of the most popular Conference for Women speakers of 2018. A former preschool teacher, she does what few people can. She makes talking about money fun, relatable, and actionable. Tiffany is the bestselling author of The One Week Budget and Live Richer Challenge. She’s also been featured on Good Morning America, The Today Show, the New York Times, and many other outlets. We’re very happy she’s with us here today on Women Mean Business. Tiffany, thanks so much for being with us.

Tiffany Aliche: Thank you for having me, Lisa. I’m excited. My baby sister’s name is Lisa. So I’m like, “Oh.”

Lisa Bennett (CFW): Oh, that’s right. You have a Lisa Test, don’t you?

Tiffany Aliche: Yeah, Lisa Rule.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): Lisa Rule. I like that.

Tiffany Aliche: Yes. If I wouldn’t share something with Lisa, whether it’s a financial tip or service or app or whatever because I’m protective over her financial journey, then I will not share it with someone else.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): How perfect is that? So before we get into your great strategies about how we maximize our money and live richer in 2019, let’s talk a little bit about you. I always enjoy starting conversations this way, but in your case, it seems really particularly relevant because your story is such proof that your strategies work. After all, there was a time when you were, I believe, $300,000 in debt. You’d lost your job, your home, your savings, and your confidence. Now you have a seven figure net worth, and you have a goal of growing a billion dollar business. Tell us what happened.

Tiffany Aliche: So I’d gone to school actually for business and marketing. And I thought I would go into the business world until I had a number of internships and I hated them. It just seemed … I mean, anyone who knows me knows that I’m pretty lighthearted and fun. And honestly, the people at the corporate place where I worked, they just seemed very unhappy. And I was like, “I don’t want to live unhappy.” And so I just remember kind of coming home and telling my parents, “I don’t know what to do. It’s junior year, and these internships are not very promising.” And so junior year I wanted to make a little extra money, and I decided to work at the childcare center on campus. And I fell in love with teaching.

So after I graduated school, instead of going into corporate America, I went into the classroom, and I became a preschool teacher. Because at the time in order for you to be a teacher for older grades, you had to be certified. And I wasn’t just yet. So I took that year become certified. But I loved preschool so much I never left. And I stayed for 10 years. And I thought I was going to be there forever and ever until the 2009 recession hit. And that year, my school, which was a nonprofit based school, they lost their funding. And so suddenly three days before the new school year, me and the other teachers didn’t have a job. And I just a few years before that had just bought my first home. I bought a condo. So now I didn’t have a job.

And teaching is one of those jobs that they don’t start the new school year with no teachers. So it’s not a job where you can say, “Oh, I’m just going to apply and find another teaching position easily,” because a classroom must have a teacher. So every classroom already had their teacher. So we were kind of like, “Well, what do we do now?” And it was really traumatizing because I had this condo. I had just gotten my masters. So I had like $50,000 worth of student loan debt. And it was just I wasn’t sure what I should do. And I ended up losing everything. I ended up taking all the money out of my retirement account to try to save my home, which I ended up losing to foreclosure anyway. I ended up at age 30 moving back home with my parents and just kind of starting from scratch.

But I grew up in a household where money was tight all the time. My father, he’s now retired, was a CFO and an accountant. He’s got his master’s in economics and his bachelor’s in finance. I’m one of five girls. My mom was really the practical financial guru in our house with raising five girls and buying clothes and shoes and food and that kind of stuff. So I grew up in a household where we would have money lessons all the time. And so despite the fact of losing everything, it wasn’t as traumatizing for me as it was for my friends. So I started showing them how I was able to keep my head above water. And so I started showing them and then their friends and then their friends. But I had always kind of been the go-to girl for money since college.

So the Budgetnista really started because during the recession and post-recession people really needed practical help of how do I stay afloat. And so I started by just helping friends. And then one day someone asked me how much I cost because a friend of a friend told them that I’d help them. And I was like, “Oh no, I don’t cost anything.” And my best friend was like, “Uh, you need to, because you don’t have money.” And that’s how Budgetnista was born.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): I love that. And I wish you had been my friend in college. So it seems like one of the key factors in what you’ve lost and regained in that chapter was your confidence.

Tiffany Aliche: Yes, because here’s the thing I realized. I knew what to do, but I was afraid that maybe I’d forgotten or somehow I’d lost something. And it’s not true. I just lost my confidence. I didn’t lose my knowledge.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): So I’m curious. You’ve taught so many women now. What do you see in terms of mindset issues? Are there certain ways in which women tend to lack confidence when it comes to money and suggestions for how to get into the right mindset?

Tiffany Aliche: Yeah. So I find women largely lack the confidence, not the ability. And I find that women are, and myself included, that we mix up our confidence with our ability. And so, “Oh, I can’t do that.” Why? “Well, I didn’t go to school for that.” Well, most people didn’t go to school for finance. You’ll even find in classrooms that … I mean, this is what they used to teach us as teachers is that boys tend to be overconfident. So they only need to be about 40% sure before raising their hand and shouting out the answer.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): Doesn’t sound familiar.

Tiffany Aliche: Girls need to feel a hundred percent sure before they’ll shout out the answer or raise their hand to even share an answer. And so that kind of follows us into adulthood where we feel like if we’re not a hundred percent sure how to do something, then somehow that speaks to like our character or speaks to our ability to learn. And that’s just not true. And I find that once I start to break down basic financial tenants to women … I mean, because I’ll meet women who are doctors, who are engineers, who are … I mean, these are bright, brilliant women. And then you talk about a budget and savings and beginning investing, and they’re like, “Oh, I don’t know.” I’m like, “Really? Because you went to medical school.” I don’t know what it is about finance that has everyone so scared. And I think it’s just culturally, we’ve been raised to think about money in a fearful way. I was fortunate in that I don’t have those hangups because that’s just not the way money was spoken about in our household.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): And you heard it so early, which many people don’t.

Tiffany Aliche: Exactly. So early. I mean, I can remember … Well, I don’t remember this, but my dad tells a story when I was like four and I would run the water. I would go into the bathroom and turn on the faucet because I liked the way the water sounded. Apparently I was [inaudible 00:08:26] before it was cool. And they could not figure out how to get me to stop turning on the water in all the bathrooms and just walking away. And so when we were little, we didn’t have a lot of money. And so during the summer when the ice cream truck came around, everybody had a day. Since I’m the second born, my day was Tuesday. And so Tuesday if the ice cream truck came around, I could go to my dad and say, “Hey, it’s Tuesday. It’s my day. Can I have a dollar for the ice cream truck?”

And so that Tuesday, I went to him and asked for my dollar. And he said, “Oh, Tiffany, you just missed the water man. Every time you want water, we have to pay him. So I had to give him your dollar.” I mean, apparently from what I hear I had a meltdown like, “Wait, what do you mean? That’s my dollar.” But guess who never, ever, ever ran the water again in that way? But those were the kinds of lessons that he always matched what was important to him financially to what was important to me and what was age appropriate. Because I didn’t care about the water bill, I cared about ice cream. And so that was kind of how I learned about money in this really practical, applicable way.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): What a good parent. So speaking of practical, I would love to continue to talk about your experiences because you’re just so much fun. But if we don’t get to the practical-

Tiffany Aliche: Yes.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): … people are going to be unhappy. So here we are. We’re still early in a new year, which is just a great time to establish some positive goals and intentions. So for those of us who want to think about how to maximize our money this year, what are some of the most important things that we should do?

Tiffany Aliche: So there’s some core tenants. There is a budget. There’s a savings plan. There is a plan for your credit. There is a debt plan, insurance, and investing. So that’s like six things: budget, savings, debt, credit, insurance, and investing. But let’s start really with just the foundation. So no matter how wealthy you are, there has to be some sort of budget in place. So I think people have taken the word budget and used it interchangeably with restriction. And that’s just not true. The budget, it’s merely a picture of what your finances are doing. And at any moment you can tell the picture to look like something else.

So I like to call my budget my say yes plan. So I might want to go on vacation. What can I do to my budget to get it to say yes? I might want to buy a house. What can I do to my budget to get it to say yes? A budget is not restrictive. If I’m manipulated properly, your budget can get you to the yes that you want. So to me, there are two extremes to your budget. There’s one that I call your noodle budget, and then there’s your best life budget. So your noodle budget is … And everyone should know what their noodle budget is no matter how wealthy.

That means: if I had to eat ramen noodles, if everything fell apart, I lost my job, you lost everything, what is the lowest that you can get your budget to if you have to cut out everything? Not that you’re not that you’re going to live there, but you should just know what that number looks like. Well, I could live off of $3,500 a month, or I could live off of 1500. Whatever that looks like, just to know in the back of your mind if the recession hits or you lose your job or your spouse gets sick, what could you drop down to temporarily in order to stabilize yourself? So knowing what your noodle budget is it’s going to be really critical.

And then your best life budget that is living to the exact amount of what you’re making. So if you’re making $5,000 a month, then your best life budget is $5,000 a month. The truth is no one, not even Oprah should be living at her best life budget, because the assumption is is that there will be no emergencies. You make 5,000, you spend 5,000. But then what happens when the water heater bursts? What happens when your child needs braces? And so you should know what your best life budget is, but you should be living at all times, for the most part, somewhere between your noodle budget and your best life budget.

So when things are going good, you might live at like 80% of that. “Okay, I’m 80%, so I’m only 20% away from my best life budget, because I’m saving this 20%. You know what? Times are really tight, so I’m really in the lower half. I’m living really close to my noodle budget because I’m looking for a job, but I’m fairly confident I’m going to find one.” So if you start with that and a budget to create one is just super simple, listing everything you spend money on. So that’s groceries, bills, stuff for the kids, just everything. If you’re not sure, take out your debit card or take out your bank statement and see where your money’s kind of going. So listing everything, not just traditional expenses, but expenses like cash expenses. Maybe you do grooming, your hair or whatever that is.

So listing that, then what those things cost you a month. So your mortgage is the same every month. Your rent is the same. But what about groceries? Look at your bank statement. Do an average of the last few months. What about the kids? How much are you spending on them? But you want a monthly snapshot of what that specific expenses costing you. And the last step is to add up that list I like to call your money list. Add up that money list and subtract it from your monthly take home. So all of your expenses listed, what they cost you a month, add up that money list, and subtract it from your monthly take home. And where do you stand? Are you spending more than you make? Are you spending less than you make? But that is a basic budget. And then from there, you can really start to move on to the other parts of your financial life.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): Well, you make it sound easy. Just pulling out that debit card and looking is a little scary.

Tiffany Aliche: It is. It is. So here’s the thing. Let’s just say, because I like … So the teacher in me, so the kids used to call me Ms. Tiffany. So Ms. Tiffany would say, “Okay, so if you’re scared to start a budget,” and you’re like, “Oh, I’m not ready yet,” here’s some things you can do that are like, “I’m not ready to do a budget, but I want to do better.” So one, you can open up … I just did this with my husband, because the other day a friend of his asked him to borrow money. And he was like, “I didn’t have the amount that I thought I would have saved.” I mean, I knew that because I see him with his debit card.

And so my husband and I, we have a joint savings account. But we each have our own separate savings account that you can kind of use. We have the family money and that we have individual money. So you’re able to use your individual money however you like. And so I said, “Well, here’s what I suggest,” and this is what I suggest to you, “is to open up an online only savings account.” So there are banks like Ally bank or Barclays or Capital One has online only banks. So if you open up … And there’s a website called magnifymoney.com, where they list all of these online banks. So you’re finding one with no fees, a low balance that you have to deposit like as low as $1, and it’s free and it’s FDIC insured. But most banks are that. If not, they wouldn’t be banks. And then you’re looking for the highest interest rate based upon having a low deposit. So you’re going to look for this online only bank. Let’s just say, I’m going to make up a bank name. We’ll call it Bank of Budgetnista.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): That’s coming I’m sure.

Tiffany Aliche: You find this online only bank. What’s so great about an online only bank is two things. One, so I had my husband open up an online only bank. And I said, “Go to your job tomorrow, ask HR if you can split your paycheck. So some of your money is going to go to your normal checking account. Some of your money is going to go to this online only bank.” So he said, “Okay.” So he split, I don’t know, maybe like $300. So now when he gets paid, automatically $300 is going into his online only bank account. So one, he’s earning a much higher interest rate because the bank account we have is I think it’s like 2.2% versus a traditional brick and mortar bank. And those you’re earning, I don’t know, .001%, a piece of a penny. So one, you earn higher interest.

Two, it makes your money inconvenient. Because with that online only bank, I don’t want you to open up a checking account with that bank, because it’s very easy to transfer from savings to checking and then to swipe your card. The only way you should have access to your money and your online only bank is through your traditional brick and mortar bank account. So my husband’s brick and mortar bank, if he wants to pull his savings out of his online only bank, he has to request a transfer from online only to brick and mortar. And that transfer takes at minimum 24 hours. So let’s just say he sees, I don’t know, a new shirt that he really wants, even though he’s saving for maybe a new car. So he’s at his favorite, I don’t know, clothing store and says, “Ooh, I really want the shirt.” He looks at his checking account at his brick and mortar on his phone. And if there’s not enough money for the shirt, normally he could easily make a transfer and say, “From my savings to my checking, let me buy the shirt now.”

Unless he’s going to sleep at the shirt place for 24 hours, that transfer is going to deny him the ability to buy that shirt impulsively. So it makes your money in inconvenient, and inconvenient money gets saved. So even if you don’t create a budget, just setting aside money automatically in an online only bank account, you force some savings even without a budget. So that part is important. And another tip is I believe in having at least two checking accounts, one for spending, one for bills. So if you work for a large enough company, typically they allow you to split your paycheck up to about three different ways.

So my husband’s paycheck splits. Some goes into our joint bill’s account, some goes into his spending account, and some goes in his savings account. And so what’s so great about having a separate bank account for bills is that it really cuts down on overdrafting. Because oftentimes maybe it’s a holiday and a bill didn’t come out yet. And you don’t realize. And it’s in the same checking account that your debit card is attached to. So you’re swiping and spending, and now you’ve spent some of your electric bill money. And now you’re like, “Oh, I’ve overdrafted.” But if you have a separate bills account, the only way for that money to come out is if it pays a bill.

So you separate, create a separate checking account. You can literally name it online and call it bills. You put your bill money in there every pay period. And then you tell that bills account to pay the bills for you. You automate it, because automation is a new discipline. So the bills account knows on the first to pay your mortgage, on the third to pay your cell phone bill. And it’ll pay those bills for you. Or you could just go in every two weeks and pay those bills yourself from your bills account. But separating your money into savings, spending, and bills is really going to be your best friend. So even if you’re like, “I’m not ready for a budget,” just doing those three separations are really going to help you.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): I love the fun you bring to this. It’s like you make it a game. The budget isn’t the budget. It’s the say yes plan. Use the little tricks to make it inconvenient to get to your money. That’s great. So, when you’ve spoken at the conferences for women, there are usually lines out the door of people asking questions. And so folks have a lot of questions. We have a limited amount of time with you today, so I want to see if we can quickly hit on a few of these.

Tiffany Aliche: Okay.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): In the news recently, we certainly heard about the government shut down and how that affected more than 800,000 federal workers who suddenly found themselves without a paycheck. And just this week, there was a study out that said that six out of 10 of those workers who had emergency savings set aside depleted all or most of it during that time.

Tiffany Aliche: Okay.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): Unexpected financial hardship can come up in a lot of different ways. How do we figure out what’s the right amount of money to put aside?

Tiffany Aliche: It depends really on the industry that you’re in and how quickly you can replace that money. So, my sister is an engineer. So when she lost her job, it took her almost a year and a half to find another job, because it’s not easy to find an engineering job if you’re a new engineer. So if you have like 10-20 years of experience but she was in her twenties. So it took her a long time. But my mother is a nurse. So she would need, I would say at least a year’s worth of emergency savings. So emergency savings is basically your noodle budget times the amount of months you think it’s going to take for you to get back on your feet. So for her, it would be her noodle budget times 12 months.

My mom who’s a nurse, nurses are in high demand always. I remember being in high school, and her hospital shut down. Before her hospitals shut down, she had like 20 job offers. The phone never stopped ringing at our house, because nurses are such high demand. Someone like my mom, she would need her noodle budget times I would say three months is more than fine, because it’s not going to take her even three months to replace her income.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): Right.

Tiffany Aliche: And that’s what I would say. You would just have to know how quickly in your industry can you replace your income as far as months are concerned. And figure out your noodle budget and multiply it times those months.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): Awesome tip. Here’s here’s another challenge a lot of people face, young people in particular, college debt. You mentioned that you had some significant debt yourself. I had significant debt. I read that many young people today think they’ll never pay that off.

Tiffany Aliche: Yeah.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): That’s a heavy emotional, as well as a practical, burden. How do you recommend thinking about that?

Tiffany Aliche: I’m not going to lie it’s a lot. It’s a lot. So I just recently paid off my student loan debt. So here’s what I realized about debt and just debt in general, including student loan debt, that it is important that you don’t make it the focus. Because if you focus on being debt free, that’s exactly what you’ll get. There are people who have … They’re debt free, but they have zero money in their bank accounts. So they’re still struggling. Debt free is not the same as well. But if you focus on growing well, you can also accomplish being debt free. So what I would say is I would create a debt pay-down plan. If you’ve never heard of the snowball method, just Google it or the avalanche method. These are two ways that you can begin to pay down debt systematically.

So one creating a systematic that pay-down plan that you can automate. I personally use the snowball method. It just means that you pay the minimums plus a little to your debt. I don’t want to like extend. I’ll talk forever on it. So the snowball method or the avalanche method, a quick Google search, and you’re like, “Okay, there’s even calendars that help you to figure it out what that is.” So create your debt pay down plan and then leave it. Let the plan work itself. It took me a long time to stop putting every last cent I had toward my debt, because all it was doing was getting me debt free.

So then after I realized I have my plan, it’s automated. It’s set in place. Then I put my focus toward growing well, so creating my business, figuring out other ways to make income. Because what ended up happening is as I was creating and making more money, then I got to a space where I could pay down my debt more efficiently. And so wealth will help you to, one, live better in the present in the now and then two go back and take care of your debt. So focusing on creating wealth for yourself is going to take care of that.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): And it’s also more fun.

Tiffany Aliche: Yes, it is.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): How do I do that?

Tiffany Aliche: To do what?

Lisa Bennett (CFW): How do I create wealth? How do we do that?

Tiffany Aliche: Well, I mean, honestly, to create wealth is there a few things. A business is a great way to create wealth. There’s nothing wrong with working for someone, obviously, because here’s the thing. When I was teaching preschool, I was creating wealth. I was making $39,000 a year. And I was living very simply. And I was saving my income and investing. So you can start your own business, which is typically a faster path to creating wealth, because you’re not limited to how much somebody will pay you. But if you have a regular nine to five job, you have to live off less than you make.

Here’s the thing. People don’t realize that savings is a critical component to wealth, because you can’t create wealth if you’re not saving anything. Because part of the savings is for, yes, emergency funds, but the other part of your savings is to invest. So you make your money, you live off ideally 80% or less of your income. And then you invest and save the rest. So you might invest 10% and save 10% toward your emergency savings and then 10% toward your investment plan. So that’s one way to grow wealth. And a faster way, like I said, is to start a business. So I started the Budgetnista. And at first, I remember my first year, I said, “If I could just make 500 bucks a month. That’s it. If I could just make that.” And now my business makes seven figures a year and has made me a self-made millionaire, because I finally stopped focusing just on debt and tried to focus on how do I monetize the skillset that I have.

I’m really good at teaching and financial education is something I grew up with and I’ve taken just about every class you can think of. So how do I met mesh those two things that I’m passionate about? And I created the Budgetnista. So all of us have skillsets that it’s possible to monetize. And maybe not even that. I mean, everyone monetized to their skill set. They started a business in something totally, totally different. Yeah. I mean, starting a business for me was really the ticket out. But even if I had not started a business, I was well on my way as a preschool teacher to growing well.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): And we’re going to watch you go from preschool teacher to billionaire one of these days I believe.

Tiffany Aliche: That’s the end. Well, not so much billionaire. But I really believe that I can grow. I mean, I never thought I could run a, I mean, multi seven figure a year business. Literally 10 years ago, I would be sitting in a classroom right now. Around this time, it’s story time for the kids right before they take a nap. So to go from that in 10 years to say, “Oh, I’ve got a staff of over 20. And we manage this multi seven figure your business.” And quite honestly, in the next couple of months, we’ll probably have our first seven figure month, let alone seven figures a year.

I mean, incredulous. Well, I will say to the billion dollar business, I think that financial education should start as early as possible. And I think that parents, teachers, and schools are more open to it. I just helped an assembly woman in New Jersey to write a bill that just was passed into law in my state in New Jersey. I call it the Budgetnista law, but it’s really law A1414. But the Budgetnista law sounds so much better. So in New Jersey, we already have a law in place that says that high school students must learn financial education. But I said, it should start as young as elementary and middle school. So the middle school portion of the law passed. So starting September of this new school year, middle school students will receive financial education in the classroom. So I’m going back to the legislation.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): That’s terrific.

Tiffany Aliche: Thank you. Because I really believe that so many of us are struggling as adults because we didn’t get this and we ought to. And so my billion dollar business idea is to create this character. I’m like, “Dora the Explorer, everyone loved her.” I’m like, “Well, why can’t there be a character that teaches pre-financial lessons to little ones so they can start to lay a strong foundation. So they don’t struggle when they get to be adults.”

Lisa Bennett (CFW): I love it. Well, I just want to say thank you for sharing your expertise and being so committed to helping other women with this. I think it’s really terrific. And there’s so much more that you offer, your resources and your challenges. And I’d like to just give you a moment before we wrap up to let people know about how they can get more information from you.

Tiffany Aliche: So I’m all over social media as The Budgetnista, so think of fashionista but with the word budget. So it’s B-U-D-G-E-T-N-I-S-T-A. So you can find me on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter. But most importantly, I have a ton of free resources, because I really do believe to whom much is given much is required. And I think I want to be an example that you can do good work, help good people, and make good money. I think that those three things are not mutually exclusive. So I have a ton of free resources. I have my Live Richer Challenges. And you can learn more about them at livericherchallenge.com. And those are all free financial challenges that I do a new one every year.

I also have my online school, which is called the Live Richer Academy. And that’s where the people that helped me to become … I mean, self-made millionaire is deceptive because no one does it by themselves. So this is like my team of people that helped me from my lawyer to my student loan expert. These people that I leaned on, I asked them to teach classes. And they donated their time. And so I started this online school where those same lessons they taught me, they teach in this online school. And you can learn more about the Live Richer A Academy at livericheracademy.com. But if you just want to get started just now, you’re like, “Oh, I want a budget to figure out how do I save more. I want to travel. I want a better life,” I actually have just this … It’s about 45 minutes to an hour. It’s an online class that I teach. And it’s how to budget your way to savings, travel, and a better life. And if you want to register for it, it’s totally free. I do a ton of these all the time.

You can go to budgetnistabudgetclass.com. So that’s budgetnistabudgetclass.com. And that class is just me, you, and a few hundred other women working through all of the things that kind of glossed over now. But I really dive deep and I give you all the tools you need to succeed, because I know what it’s like to feel alone and afraid. I know it was like to feel ashamed about making financial choices that weren’t the best financial choices. I know what it’s like to feel hopeless and helpless. And I don’t want that for other women. And that the truth is you’re not alone unless you choose to be. The truth is you are capable. You are able. And that if someone just gave you the resources, you could kill it. And I want to help you kill it.

Lisa Bennett (CFW): That’s awesome. Well, thank you so much for being with us. And for those of you who still have some burning questions, please know you can join Tiffany for an exclusive Facebook live event with a conference for women community next Tuesday. Well, on Tuesday rather, February 19th at 2:00 Eastern, 11:00 Pacific. And we’ll be back next month with Shawn Achor, one of the world’s foremost experts on happiness, success, and achieving your big potential. Remember to subscribe to this podcast now, so you don’t miss out on this and future conversations on Women Mean Business. Until then, this is Lisa Bennett for the Conference for Women.


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