40 foot chicken house trusses

40 foot chicken house trusses DEFAULT

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If you both have flock or would like to get hens, you need to know if it is worth the cost to develop a chicken house. The answer will be based on upon you. However, there are several simple chicken house strategies on the market the two on the internet as well as in a physical area. Chicken houses are easy to construct and will acquire shape very quickly. A chicken coop is essentially the home for your chickens and will the simple to construct and build for the protection of the chickens on your property. Now with that said, how do you create a chicken house? Fowl houses have to be made out of strong materials and designed for environmental surroundings that you simply live in. In comfortable places capable and line fabric tailgate enclosures. In cooler climates you simply must use slider glass windows. There are numerous easy chicken pens ideas open to you that will range for the an easy task to the sublime. These pens take various forms fresh fruits, you'll need to be able to find on the inside to both gather ovum and also to clean up the chicken coop to keep the chickens safe and healthy. A hen house should be constructed at the very least 60 in . substantial with a ft ...
Sours: https://sites.google.com/site/buildchickencoop4996atmontana/easy-chicken-house-trusses-for-sale-craigslist-for-sale-website
Chicken house trusses, roofing tin, pole barn kits
1 Chicken house trusses, roofing tin, pole barn kits 35974 $1.00 Used There is a woman named Melanie Malone who advertises on this and other NE AL sites wanting to buy chicken houses and sell barn kits. Buyer beware when dealing with these people!!! This woman’s husband Marty Malone contracted with me to tear down our poultry barns, haul off all debris, and leave our lot completely cleared. He took trusses and roofing tin only, did not pay for everything he took, and left us with a huge, expensive mess to clean up. He owes us a large sum of money and I am sure he probably does this to many former growers. If you buy from him, you are supporting a thief and a liar. I would like to save other farmers from the mess he has left us with. 256-453-2841

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Lubing nipple drinkers
6000 feet Lubing nipple drinkers 42220 $50 % of new price Used For Sale 6000 plus feet of lubing nipple drinkers in excellent condition we take out and load on your truck or you remove for a cheaper price Call 270-779-5454 located in Elkton Ky. 2707795454

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Metal Trusses 35 foot wide Truss I Beam heavy duty metal steel
Metal Trusses Metal Trusses 35 foot wide Truss I Beam heavy duty metal steel 30563 $195 Used 71" tall 35 foot wide I beam truss metal / steel 25 available 8 X 4 beam on all the truss except for the post 6 X 4 I beam post. The truss is 30" higher in the middle than on the end. Was spaced 14 to 16 foot apart in the previous usage $195 each for 5 or more $215 each for less than 5 trusses. There is 2 options for hauling. We can load them on a 40' trailer as is or we can cut them in half and load them on a 20' trailer. You will need a minimum of a 40 foot or 20 foot trailer to haul them on depending on whether you choose to have them cut in half. You will need proper flagging for the overhang of the trusses. You are responsible for the proper positioning of the trusses on your trailer. You are responsible for securing the trusses securely on your trailer. 7064998008

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Ceiling Material insulated with Radiant Barrier
$.089 Cents a sq ft. Ceiling Material insulated with Radiant Barrier 76013 $$.089 cents a sqft New Innovative Insulation Inc is a 33 year old family owned manufacturing Company. In 2016 we re-engineered our woven Polyethylene "Tri-Ply"to improve its thermal performance by 95%. The New product is called Ag-Barrier and has 95% reflective coating on one side to eliminated harmful heat radiation from the drop ceiling of a poultry house. Using Ag-Barrier as your drop ceiling will reduce the summer temperatures under the ceiling by 10 degrees.and will reduce propane consumption in the winter by 20%. This technology has been in poultry houses since 2016 with tremendous results.Call 1800/825/0123 ask for Perry 1800/825/0123 8172666524

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Premium Bubble Insulation
$.19 cents a square foot Premium Bubble Insulation 76013 $$.19 New Innovative Insulation Inc is a 33 year old family owned manufacturing company located in central Tx.

He have Single Bubble foil foil stiff premium bubble insulation that comes with a lifetime warrantee. The rolls come 4'X 125' 500sqft rolls.

The Premium bubble has same thermal performance and is stiffer than double bubble so it installs twice as fast saving labor.

Call 1800/825/0123 and ask for Perry 8172666524

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Ceiling Material Poly Black White
$.06 cents a Square Foot Ceiling Material Poly Black White 76013 $$.06 a square foot New Innovative Insulation Inc is a 33 year old family owned manufacturer. We manufacture woven Polyethylene "Tri-Ply" We manufacture this material in 52", 104", 129" and 150" widths. We can roll these widths into any length you need.
We ship wordwide Call and ask for Perry 1800/825/0123 8172666524

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Metal Roofing / Tin
Roof Metal Metal Roofing / Tin 30563 $25.00 per sheet Used In very good condition
20 ft. length
3 ft wide

$25.00 per piece for more than 20 pieces
$30.00 per piece for 10 to 20 pieces

Metal Roofing
You will need a double axle trailer to haul this metal. If the trailer is shorter than 20 feet you will need to figure out how and where the metal roofing is going to hang over.
You are responsible for proper and safe loading and safely securing the load. 7064998008

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Chicken House Removal/Destruction/Demoliti
Per housr Chicken House Removal/Destruction/Demoliti 30563 $Payment will be building materials and expenses Other Chicken house total removal
Multiple houses to be took down
Payment will be the materials and equipment
House size 36 x 500 built in 1985
Tin is in excellent shape 7064998008

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Roof metal
3x24 roof metal Roof metal 21811 $$5.00 each Used I have about 80 sheets of 3x24 roof metal good for decoration etc. The other side is not rusted. The roof is old as you can see from the pictures but it does not leak. It was nailed on. I drilled a small hole in the one inch over hang and it has some life left. I will sell at $5.00 each. Dennis 410 641 2519. Please call, no emails Please call me for a better picture of the roof. I cannot delete and change this one. 410-641-2519

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Spray foam insulation
Southern insulation services Spray foam insulation 36330 $Free quotes New Adding foam insulation can greatly benefit your poultry house, spray foam provides a air sealant, adds r-value to the wall, helps with static pressure and helps save gas. Feel free to call for a free price quote.
334-714-2230 3347142230

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Poultry house curtains
PER SET Poultry house curtains 2188 $2 New We manufacture and install poultry,piggery house curtains per your specifications 0782833322

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Poultry house curtains
PER SET Poultry house curtains 2188 $2 New We manufacture and install poultry,piggery house curtains per your specifications 0782833322

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Knee Braces
Each Knee Braces 35640 $$4.00 Each Other Approximately 200 new and slightly used 2"X2"X26" knee braces 256-566-6172

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40 ft Trusses for sale
40 ft trusses 40 ft Trusses for sale 36273 $50.00 each Used For sale (17) 40 ft wooden trusses in good condition came from a chicken house that was torn down. $50 each in the Ranburne, Al area. 404-680-6058

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USED GALVANIZED ROOFING METAL *NO RUST*
Ft USED GALVANIZED ROOFING METAL *NO RUST* 35055 $$1-.75 Used I have 23’ 26’ 33’ 36’ and 40’ sheets of used roofing metal off poultry houses. Everything is only a few years old, screwed not nailed, no rust and in great shape!
Also have some red painted metal in great shape.
To place an order call 2565903869
Can deliver
DJ Robertson 256-590-3869

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USED GALVANIZED ROOFING METAL *NO RUST*
Ft USED GALVANIZED ROOFING METAL *NO RUST* 35055 $$1-.75 Used I have 23’ 26’ 33’ 36’ and 40’ sheets of used roofing metal off poultry houses. Everything is only a few years old, screwed not nailed, no rust and in great shape!
Also have some red painted metal in great shape.
To place an order call 2565903869
Can deliver
DJ Robertson 256-590-3869

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Used Metal
Each Used Metal 35901 $$20 Used Used chicken house metal 23' long
256.390.3300 256.390.3300

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Used Tin
Pervsheet Used Tin 36005 $10 Used Used tin from poultry houses. Great condition. Approximately 3x 22'. 3344619244

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Poultry house doors
per unit Poultry house doors 30217 $$98----$178 New We have in stock 36 inch and 48 inch wide doors 72 inches tall and 80 inches tall. We also have 16 inch wide doors for cooling pads. We are located in Ephesus,Georgia--right on the GA/ALA state line. We also carry sliding door track. 7708544451 or 7708548412. Delivery available. 770-854-4451

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METALS, AND LUMBERS
SOLD SEPERATLEY METALS, AND LUMBERS 35974 $$60.00 Each TRUSSES Used TRUSSES $60.00 EACH. GOOD CONDITION CAME FROM CHICKEN HOUSE BEING TORN DOWN.

METAL $20.00 PER SHEETS. EXCELLENT CONDITION. NO RUST OR HOLES IN METAL.

MIS. LUMBER ( 2x4 ) $3.00 EACH OTHER LUMBER ALSO

CONTACT MARTY MALONE (256 630 6789) CALL OR TEXt message 256 630 6789

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Sours: https://www.chickentrain.com/
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Factors Contributing to Poultry House Structural Failures

Dr. Sid Thompson
Michael Czarick
Dr. John Worley
Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department

Note: This publication contains several images and may be slow to load.

A poultry house can be considered a complex system in which all parts of the system work together to accomplish a task. Each element of the house structure (foundation, walls, knee braces, trusses, etc.) has a certain form and function that acts to support loads (e.g., wind, snow, ice) applied to the house. Poultry houses are often considered to be simple, even low-tech structures. While not complex to construct they are no less complex in how they carry loads from each part of the structure to the ground. Each part of the structure interacts with other parts. For example, a poorly built foundation can create stresses in other parts of the building (e.g. trusses), which can eventually result in failure.

Foundations

Figure 1. Column of soil
Figure 1. Column of soil.

The loads in a structure are transmitted through the structure and eventually to the ground through the foundation. The size and type of foundation used to support a structure are based on the magnitude of the loads being transmitted to the ground as well as the properties of the soil beneath a structure. The maximum load that a foundation can carry is based on the bearing capacity of the soil. The soil beneath the structure should be well drained, have a uniform consistency and be free of organic material. Uniform, compacted soil underneath the foundation is just as important as the foundation itself.

A freestanding column of soil such as the one in Figure 1 cannot stand on its own if loaded vertically. While soil can carry a load, a freestanding column of soil fails when loaded. As it fails the column will get shorter and wider. Even though the column of soil is only loaded vertically, lateral (horizontal) forces occur within the soil that make it wider.

If this same column of soil is placed within a container, then the column can carry a larger vertical load. The container walls keep the soil confined within the container and help carry the lateral (horizontal) loads that occur within the soil.

Figure 2. Loaded, unsupported soil column
Figure 2.Loaded, unsupported soil column.

A building transfers loads throughout the structure to the foundation, which then transfers the load to the soil directly beneath the foundation. Like the column of soil in Figure 2, the soil directly beneath the foundation can only carry these loads if it is properly confined. The confinement in this case does not come from a container but rather from the adjacent soil (Figure 3). It is normally assumed that a triangular block of soil helps confine the soil directly beneath the foundation.

Figure 3. Soil next to a foundation providing “containment? of the soil column under the foundation
Figure 3.Soil next to a foundation providing “containment” of the soil column under the foundation.

The integrity of the foundation is critically important to the integrity of the structure. The foundation should not be neglected. Problems with foundations can cause problems throughout the entire structure. Though roof trusses are often the focus in the case of poultry house failures, more often than not the root cause of the failure can be tied in part or in whole to foundation issues.

Depth

Figure 5. An exposed foundation due to erosionFigure 5. An exposed foundation due to erosion
Figure 5.An exposed foundation due to erosion.
Figure 4. Foundation trench
Figure 4. Foundation trench
Figure 4.Foundation trench.

The minimum depth of a poultry house foundation below ground level is generally 12 inches or below the frost line, whichever is greater (Figure 4). The depth of the foundation is measured from the surface of the undisturbed ground to the bottom surface of the foundation. In the case of poultry houses with concrete “stem walls,” the stem wall is the foundation and therefore the bottom of the wall should extend a minimum of 12 inches below the soil surface.

In post houses the posts themselves act as the foundation. It is generally recommended that posts be buried a minimum of 36 inches in firm soil. Posts carry loads to the soil differently than concrete foundations, hence the reason for the increased depth in the ground. Wood framing members below grade must be of approved naturally durable or preservative treated wood that is resistant to both decay and termites. It is preferred that the bottom end of the post be embedded in concrete.

Foundations that are near or above grade can be easily undermined by erosion, rodents or even birds. Once a foundation is undermined the structural integrity of the poultry house is compromised (Figure 5).

Drainage

Saturated soil has little strength to support a poultry house foundation in either the vertical or horizontal directions, thus allowing movement. Figure 6 illustrates the shear strength (bearing capacity) of clay soil as a function of percent soil moisture. Under normal moisture conditions, clay soil is capable of supporting a load of roughly 1,800 pounds per square foot. But as clay soil moisture levels increase, the bearing capacity of the ground underneath the foundation decreases rapidly. If the soil in the immediate vicinity of a poultry house is chronically saturated with water, a foundation will be more prone to settling and rotational issues that can lead to a structural failure (Figure 7). As a result, it is important that the soil around a foundation be well drained. Foundation drainage can be aided through the use of foundation drains, permeable soils or rock.

Figure 6. Clay soil shear strength as a function of percent moisture
Figure 6.Clay soil shear strength as a function of percent moisture.
Figure 7. Standing water can lead to foundation problems
Figure 7. Standing water can lead to foundation problems.

Exterior Grading/Erosion

Figure 8. Examples of foundations undermined by erosionFigure 8. Examples of foundations undermined by erosionFigure 8. Examples of foundations undermined by erosion
Figure 8. Examples of foundations undermined by erosion.

The bottom portion of a poultry house foundation must remain covered with soil (Figure 8). The ground around a poultry house should slope gradually (i.e., 1/12) away from the side wall to help direct water from the roof away from the foundation. It is generally recommended that the horizontal distance from the edge of the foundation to the face of any steep slope (3/12+) be a minimum of 5 feet. For steep slopes, rock may be required to prevent erosion.

The ground in the vicinity of the foundation should be protected from scouring due to rainwater flowing off the roof of the poultry house through the use of vegetative ground cover, rocks or gutters (Figure 9). Over time, scouring can lead to the erosion of soil near the house foundation, thereby effectively reducing foundation depth or possibly undermining the foundation. When scouring has occurred it is important that proper grade is reestablished as soon as possible to prevent foundation movement.

Figure 9. Rocks to prevent scouringFigure 9. Rocks to prevent scouring
Figure 9.Rocks to prevent scouring.

Interior grading

Figure 10. Interior Erosion - Bottom of foundationFigure 10. Interior Erosion - Foundation rotation
Figure 10.Interior Erosion: Soil should be added to maintain structural integrity. Bottom of foundation (top) and foundation rotation (bottom).

An interior foundation depth of 8 to 12 inches must be maintained in order to maintain proper vertical and lateral support. Differences between interior and exterior grades can result in uneven loads being applied to the foundation, which can lead to foundation rotation (Figure 10). When cleaning out, the foundation must be protected from damage and undermining due to excessive soil removal.

Cracking

Figure 11. Foundation cracking due to rotation/settlingFigure 11. Foundation cracking due to rotation/settlingFigure 11. Foundation cracking due to rotation/settling
Figure 11.Foundation cracking due to rotation/settling.

Cracking in a foundation wall is normally a sign of uneven settlement or wall rotation (Figure 11). Settlement is not an adverse characteristic of a structure, provided it is uniform or equal all around the structure and is not excessive. Unequal or differential settlement of a foundation can cause problems in the structure above and can cause it to lean, become unstable or produce large stresses and forces in the members throughout the structure.

Rotation

Figure 12. Measuring the angle of rotation of a concrete stem wallFigure 12. Measuring the angle of rotation of a concrete stem wallFigure 12. Measuring the angle of rotation of a concrete stem wall
Figure 12.Measuring the angle of rotation of a concrete stem wall.

Rotation of the foundation wall is normally caused by poor soil conditions — either poor (sandy) underlying soil or poor grading around the structure (Figure 12). The following criterion is suggested:

Rotation of the foundation (degrees)Suggestion
Less than 5 degreesNot a major concern
5 to 10 degreesConcern - Keep wall under watch. Consider adding soil around foundation and/or bracing the wall
Greater than 10 degreesStructure should be examined by a professional and problems must be corrected

Remember that for a concrete stem wall some slope exists in the side of the walls even with no rotation. To determine how much that built-in slope is, measure the slope near the end wall of the house or at a point where no rotation has taken place, then compare it to the slope at the rotated section.

For block walls the above-recommended rotation should be reduced if vertical steel was not placed in the wall between courses (Figure 13). Without vertical steel the rotation of the structure is carried only by the mortar joint between block courses (Figure 14).

Figure 13. Rotation of concrete block wall foundationFigure 13. Rotation of concrete block wall foundation
Figure 13. Rotation of concrete block wall foundation.
Figure 14. No vertical steel in concrete block side wallFigure 14. No vertical steel in concrete block side wall
Figure 14.No vertical steel in concrete block side wall.

Connection of the Walls to Foundation/Footers

Figure 15. Lifting force on a typical 500-foot poultry house as a function of wind speed
Figure 15.Lifting force on a typical 500-foot poultry house as a function of wind speed.

High winds moving over a poultry house roof can create powerful lifting forces that can pull the roof from the side walls or the side walls from the foundation. The lifting force on a poultry house is exponentially related to wind speed (Figure 15). That is, a doubling in wind speed can increase the lifting force four fold. For most areas of Georgia, poultry houses are supposed to be built to withstand a 90 to 100 mph wind without failure. For coastal areas the design wind speed is approximately 120 mph.

In order to maintain the structural integrity of a poultry house in high winds it is important that the foundation and side wall act as a single structural unit. Post houses are a prime example of a single structural unit because the post is continuous from the foundation to the eave of the house and acts both as the side wall and the foundation. In the case of houses with concrete blocks, the foundation must be positively connected to the blocks, which in turn must be positively connected to the remainder of the side wall. In houses with concrete stem walls the concrete stem wall must be firmly attached to the wooden portion of the wall.

Figure 16. Cores of block should be filled intermittently and J-bolts installed to connect plates to the foundationFigure 16. Cores of block should be filled intermittently and J-bolts installed to connect plates to the foundation
Figure 16.Cores of block should be filled intermittently and J-bolts installed to connect plates to the foundation.

In concrete block wall houses the sill plate should be periodically connected to the foundation through the use of anchor bolts or straps (Figure 16). The anchor bolts or straps must be placed not less than 4 inches and not more than 12 inches from the end of each member making up the sill plate. In concrete stem wall houses, the stem wall is essentially the foundation and as a result the sill plate should be connected to the stem wall through the use of “J bolts” positioned every 8 to 10 feet.

Figure 17. Nails loaded in withdrawal allowing pullout
Figure 17.Nails loaded in withdrawal allowing pullout.

Where wall framing is not continuous from the foundation sill to the roof, members should be tied together to ensure a continuous load path. The vertical members (i.e., sill plate, wall studs, truss plate) in the wall must be positively connected together through the use of lumber, straps or clips. It is important to realize that nails loaded in withdrawal (driven into the end of the studs through the bottom plate) are not sufficient to provide this positive connection in high wind conditions (Figure 17).

Figure 18. Example of side wall with a continuous load path
Figure 18.Example of side wall with a continuous load path.

Figure 18 illustrates an example of a side wall where there is a continuous load path. The sill, block wall and foundation are tied together through the use of a J-bolt and a filled concrete block core. The studs are connected to the sill by the exterior sheet metal and the interior plywood. The truss and the truss plate are tied to the side wall through the use of a “hurricane strap,” thus forming a continuous load path from the truss to the foundation.

Figure 19. Sill pate connected to stud wall using sheet metal/ lumberFigure 19. Sill pate connected to stud wall using sheet metal/ lumber
Figure 19.Sill pate connected to stud wall using sheet metal / lumber.

Figure 19 shows a curtainsided house where the bottom curtain board/exterior side wall metal is nailed to both the sill plate and the side wall members, thus tying together the lower portion of the side wall.


Exposure of Concrete Block Walls to Litter Materials

Figure 20. Erosion of block caused by manureFigure 20. Erosion of block caused by manureFigure 20. Erosion of block caused by manureFigure 20.Erosion of block caused by manure.

Concrete block walls can be degraded by the ammonia in litter. Litter has a higher pH than concrete and also contains salts and moisture. Continuous exposure to manure can reduce the strength of concrete. A precipitate layer forms on the block surface because of the manure, reducing the strength of the blocks and decreasing the cracking strength of the blocks (Figure 20). In some cases the blocks can be eroded by the presence of the litter against the block wall. Block wall foundations must be inspected for erosion of the block. If sufficient damage to the block wall occurs, then the block wall must be replaced or repaired.


Knee Braces

Figure 21. Horizontal force on a typical 500-foot poultry house as a function of wind speedFigure 21.Horizontal force on a typical 500-foot poultry house as a function of wind speed.
Figure 22. Knee braces provide support to resist sideways movementFigure 22. Knee braces provide support to resist sideways movement.

In addition to lifting forces, winds can also generate lateral forces that can push a house over. The lateral wind loads, like the lifting loads, increase exponentially with wind speed. A 40 mph gust can generate 10,000 pounds of force trying to push a poultry house over (Figure 21). In a poultry house, lateral forces are transmitted down through the truss to the walls and then the foundation through the use of knee braces (Figure 22). The knee braces eliminate rotation at the truss to wall connection points and increase the ability of the wall section to carry vertical loads. The knee braces are needed to prevent excessive lateral movement. While knee braces may not be required on each truss, knee braces must extend over much of the house to carry these loads.

The truss wall system of a poultry house is an unstable mechanism without such bracing. Without this type of bracing, the walls of a poultry house are not built to withstand the lateral forces caused by winds.

Figure 23. Knee bracesFigure 23. Knee bracesFigure 23. Knee braces
Figure 23.Knee braces.

Knee braces must be of sufficient size to carry the loads from the truss to the wall. Normally this might be 2x4 members or 1.5 inch x 1.5 inch angle iron. The connection between the knee brace and wall must be sufficient to transfer this load. It is recommended that lag bolts be used to make this connection (Figure 23).


Connection of the Truss to the Wall

Figure 24. Trusses tied to the top of a wall using “hurricane straps?Figure 24. Trusses tied to the top of a wall using “hurricane straps?Figure 24. Trusses tied to the top of a wall using “hurricane straps?
Figure 24.Trusses tied to the top of a wall using “hurricane straps.”

The truss must be positively connected to the wall to prevent problems during up-lift caused by wind loads. Where wall framing is not continuous from the foundation to the roof, the members must be secured to ensure a continuous load path. The truss must be positively connected to the wall by straps, clips or connectors made of corrosionresistant material not less than 0.040 inch in thickness (18 to 20 gage) (Figure 24). Nails loaded in withdrawal are not sufficient to provide this positive connection in high wind conditions.


Trusses

Figure 25. Bracing of trusses is essential to keep trusses vertical and to help carry loads along the length of the houseFigure 25. Bracing of trusses is essential to keep trusses vertical and to help carry loads along the length of the houseFigure 25. Bracing of trusses is essential to keep trusses vertical and to help carry loads along the length of the house
Figure 25. Bracing of trusses is essential to keep trusses vertical and to help carry loads along the length of the house.

Most trusses are manufactured using steel connector plates. Many of these trusses are pre-engineered. However, most pre-engineered trusses are designed as individual member components and do not take into account the interaction between members within the structure. While these trusses are designed to carry certain loads they may not be suitably engineered to meet all of the design needs of a structure. Often, these trusses are not designed to interact with the walls of the structure that are used to carry the lateral loads caused by wind down to the foundation.

Proper trusses should have the following:

  1. The connector plates should be located on both faces of the truss.
  2. The nails should be fully embedded in the member.
  3. The members should be cut for tight-fitting wood-towood bearing at the joints.
  4. The trusses must be braced such that they remain in a straight and plumb position (Figure 25).
  5. Trusses must be handled with care during banding, bundling, delivery and installation to avoid damage.

Roof Line

Figure 27. Poultry house with possible truss damage
Figure 27. Poultry house with possible truss damage.
Figure 26. Poultry house with straight ridge line
Figure 26. Poultry house with straight ridge line.

The roof line should be straight and horizontal inside and outside (Figure 26). From visual inspection of the house, if the roof line is not horizontal then a detailed inspection of the trusses and house must occur in the region of the house where this settlement has occurred (Figure 27). In that region the trusses must be inspected for straightness as well as any problems associated with truss plates, twisting of members, etc. The region to be inspected must extend a sufficient distance in both directions from the point where settlement has occurred to make sure no additional problems exist. Knee braces must be added in that region of the house if they are not already provided. If, during truss inspection, truss plates are found to be pulling out of the wood, trusses should be repaired using plywood gusset plates on both sides of the truss at the joint having problems. The roof should be inspected to make sure all the roof metal is adequately attached to the purlins and that no leaks occur in the roof. No sagging should be observed in the roof between trusses.


Holes in the “Tri-ply” Ceiling

From visual inspection of the house ceiling, all holes in the tri-ply must be repaired. Leaks in the try-ply ceiling allow moist, ammonia-laden air into the attic space, which can lead to deterioration of the trusses and other support structures.

Conclusion

Ben Franklin once said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” This timeless truth is nowhere more evident than in a structure such as a poultry house. The more a foundation rotates or settles, or the more out-of-square a roof truss system becomes, the more difficult and costly it is to correct the problem. Putting a little extra effort into proper construction and maintenance can pay large dividends in preventing large losses later.

The foundation, walls and trusses and the connections between them are all critical parts of the frame, and each one affects the others. A weakness in one member can cause a failure in another. By the same token, strength in one can help overcome a weakness in another. Most failures are due to a combination of weaknesses in the structural members. Improvements in any of the factors described in this publication will help the strength of the building.

The best course of action is to pay close attention to all of the critical components of the structure. When that effort has failed and problems with a building have become evident, some of the suggestions in this publication may be useful. When in doubt, contact a structural engineer to provide the expertise needed to address the problem.


Status and Revision History
Published on Sep 13, 2011
Published with Full Review on Sep 15, 2014

Sours: https://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.html?number=B1391&title=Factors%20Contributing%20to%20Poultry%20House%20Structural%20Failures
Pole Barn Build - Setting Trusses

My new building

gonna try to post some new photo's of what is currently going on. I finally got the used steel trusses from the guy who takes down chicken houses. They are for 40 foot wide building with an 18 inch overhang, and the 40 foot width would include a 20 inch wide leg on the inside. I cut off the 7 foot tall legs, and that leaves me with a truss that has about an 18 inch overhang on the bottom chord, and about a 4 foot overhang on the top chord, or the top where the purlins and metal goes.

if you need a primer on roofing 101- the purlins are 2x4's that run on thier skinny side from truss to truss. they are screwed into the trusses in the small metal plates that run perpendicular on the top chord in the photo's. the purlins are spaced every 2 feet, and there are 12 of them per half truss.

I also included a close up of how I have modified these trusses to go on my building. on the bottom chord, I have welded 3 pieces of angle iron. one 5 inch piece runs out, and 2 15 inch pieces span that and the bottom chord. this creates a level place to set the trusses on the top pf my two headers and posts.

I have predrilled one of the pieces of angle iron to accept 3/8 inch lag bolts. the holes are spaced 1 and 1/2 inches apart, and the 15 inch space allows the builder to deal with the fact the top of the 20 foot wall height varies by 2 inches in width because of the 6 inch poles at the top warping or twisting. so although the poles plus headers will be 8 1/2 inches wide, I nearly doubled that to perfectly square/true up all the trusses for a perfect ridge and flat roof sides.

If you had seen these poles when I got them, you would have seen they were ramrod straight. and they were. but even though the headers have been on them, they want to go the way they want to go. so the metal brackets at the bottom of the trusses allow for that. the poles are just about perfect at the bottom, you could run a string and get less than a 1/4 inch play all the way down it's 88 foot length. I hope the roof will be the same.

since these trusses are designed to fo on a 40 foot wide building and this is a 34, they are much heavier to handle the larger span, and I went with 8 foot on center instead of 4 foot centers. so 24 halves or 12 full spans. I have finished welding brackets on 21 of 24 halves, and will finish them tomorrow if weather cooperates. I will then pressure wash them and spray them with ospho, which is a rust converter/black primer to stop the rusting and give them a decent finish. I will finish that process next week, and the trusses hopefully go up 2 weeks from today.

I have chosen a dark green metal roof, the new white polycarbonate ridge light ( more on that later) and tan trim. The oak siding will have a reddish stain, so I think all of that will look good together. I did a mock up of the oak siding that I will take a photo of tomorrow on one wall.

Let's see if the photo's attatch.

truss small 1.jpg


truss small 2.jpg

 

Sours: https://www.lawnsite.com/threads/my-new-building.301781/page-2

House trusses foot chicken 40

Chicken House Truss Bridge

Ron Wrisinger needed a shortcut to his mailbox, so he built a walking bridge out of chicken house roof trusses. Combined with recycled fence, highline wire and other salvaged parts, he built an impressive bridge, as attractive as it is strong. About the only new parts were native oak used for the flooring.
  “It took a lot of donated parts and help from neighbors to complete, but we got it done,” says Wrisinger. “Even with new lumber, I have only $250 in it. You could buy new trusses, and it would still be an inexpensive bridge.”
  Knowing he wanted to build a bridge, a friend offered him 40-ft. trusses from a chicken barn he was tearing down. Wrisinger needed two pair to make the 80-ft. span. He also got the angle iron that had run from the foundation to support the trusses. These he cut up for uprights on the bridge and for crossbars.
  Wrisinger butt-welded each pair of trusses and welded the uprights to them about every 6 1/2 ft. He welded 3-ft. lengths of angle iron between the bottoms of the trusses at 4-ft. intervals. Where the span pairs met, he added braces at an angle to the spans and the upright, reinforcing the connection.
  Pipes from a friend’s recycled cyclone fence were welded to the bottom of the trusses and to the sides of the angle iron uprights to add more support. Longer lengths of pipe were screwed into standard fence connectors and welded to the uprights to form the handrail. To further reinforce the span, Wrisinger ran recycled highline cable through the uprights, end to end.
  “I hooked the cable to the uprights at one end and put tensioners on the other end and tightened them up,” says Wrisinger. “A friend who is an architect advised me not to go more than 3 ft. wide based on the strength and length of the trusses. He said the narrow width would help avoid side sway.”
  Wrisinger figured the narrow width would also keep ATV’s off the bridge. “Some people down here would drive their ATV’s on their mother’s grave,” he says.
  Wrisinger bought native oak for the flooring and treated 2 by 4’s for supports underneath the flooring and over the metal crossbars. Even the flooring was a good deal.
  “It was reject flooring returned to the local lumber mill and only cost me 10¢ a board foot,” he says. “I ran it through my planer to get it to size (1/2-in.). It wasn’t kiln dried, but I plan on using asphalt sealer on it with sand sprinkled in it for grip.”
  “I did all the work in front of my shop and then with the help of a couple of friends, we moved it into place,” recalls Wrisinger. “We centered a camping trailer under it and pushed it down until the trailer was in the creek. Then one friend set his truck up on high ground across the creek and hooked on to the bridge with his winch to keep the end up off the bank. At the same time, my other friend pushed it across with his backhoe.”
  One end of the bridge rests on a concrete stanchion that previously supported a car bridge. “I bolted it down to bedrock,” he says. “Neither it nor the bridge are going anywhere.”
  Contact: FARM SHOW Followup, Ronald Wrisinger, HC 73 Box 23CC, Dogpatch, Ark. 72648 (ph 870 446-2781).


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2013 - Volume #37, Issue #4
Sours: https://www.farmshow.com/a_article.php?submit_search=1&page=11&aid=27006&aid_previous=27005&aid_next=27007&page_num=3&nav_previous=1&nav_next=1
Shop Build Part 2 Trusses


Elite Veteran



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yankeeredneck - 2015-01-13 3:36 PM Looks like the uprights are anchored to concrete on that modular.

 


After posting, I was looking closer at the pic and wondered about that.  I wouldn't mind having to do concrete for the posts but we definitely cant afford to have a full concrete pad poured or a concrete foundation. 


Veteran


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Location: SouthWe bought old Chicken house trusses (steel) and built ours that way. We built a 40x60 barn at a $125 per truss totalling 12 trusses. That is not counting the tin or the lumber. It maybe something you consider.


Good Grief!


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TACKyPaints - 2015-01-14 2:31 PM

mruggles - 2015-01-13 3:27 PM i guess you could call mine a modular and its has been great and i have never had an issue..............i went a lot of years with no barn so its very nice to have..:)

Okay couple questions!

1) Did it cost you an arm and a leg? Because a couple of the modulars I priced out were just as expensive (sometimes more) than a post frame building from a place like FBI or Morton.

2) I refuse to pay to have any sort of concrete poured so, is your barn secured to the ground? I can't tell from your pics. The thought of a barn just "sitting" there scares me! lol

3) Obviously you get cold & snow, do you find it to be secure enough inside from snow/drafts, etc?

4) Who did you order your barn from?
 
 base price was 17,995.............no concrete at all...and it has anchors......and i got mine insulated and when i have 5 horses inside and its -40 with the wind blowing, its very comfortable in the barn.......and its from affordable barns in sask..............

p.s.i priced out every option i could think of and this was by far the cheapest up here...it took them 4 days to put it up and it usually takes them 3 but we got hit by a snowstorm

m

Edited by mruggles 2015-01-13 3:43 PM



Good Grief!


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yankeeredneck - 2015-01-14 2:36 PM Looks like the uprights are anchored to concrete on that modular.

 


if you mean mine...it has no concrete what so ever...



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mruggles - 2015-01-13 3:41 PM
TACKyPaints - 2015-01-14 2:31 PM

mruggles - 2015-01-13 3:27 PM i guess you could call mine a modular and its has been great and i have never had an issue..............i went a lot of years with no barn so its very nice to have..:)



Okay couple questions!



1) Did it cost you an arm and a leg? Because a couple of the modulars I priced out were just as expensive (sometimes more) than a post frame building from a place like FBI or Morton.



2) I refuse to pay to have any sort of concrete poured so, is your barn secured to the ground? I can't tell from your pics. The thought of a barn just "sitting" there scares me! lol



3) Obviously you get cold & snow, do you find it to be secure enough inside from snow/drafts, etc?



4) Who did you order your barn from?

 
 base price was 17,995.............no concrete at all...and it has anchors......and i got mine insulated and when i have 5 horses inside and its -40 with the wind blowing, its very comfortable in the barn.......and its from affordable barns in sask..............



p.s.i priced out every option i could think of and this was by far the cheapest up here...it took them 4 days to put it up and it usually takes them 3 but we got hit by a snowstorm



m

Wow! Three to four days assembly would be amazing!

Okay, well if it's warm enough where you are then I'd say it should work here in IL. :)

Maybe I'll have to look into steel modulars more closely & do a little more research on them. thanks so much!


 

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trobertson - 2015-01-13 3:41 PM We bought old Chicken house trusses (steel) and built ours that way. We built a 40x60 barn at a $125 per truss totalling 12 trusses. That is not counting the tin or the lumber. It maybe something you consider.


Where would I go about looking for old chicken house trusses? I have not a clue where to start! lol 


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Location: North Dakota My Dad, husband and I bought a  24X 96 pole barn and we each took half for $2000 total.  (tearing down that building was it's own kind of torture) We scavenged some garage doors and did all of this ourselves.  our finished barn is a closed lean 24 x 42 will hold 5 10x 10 stalls (I only feed in them and very rarely keep a horse. with plenty of room for a round bale, 100 squares and a feeding area.)  My tack is in a different building closer to the house.  It has electricity and the water is 20 feet from the door.  I don't think we have $2000 total into this, but, I have to admit we can build almost anything.  I've put tin on more buildings than I care to admit.  BUT, if you are on a budget, you either need to learn how or go without until you can afford someone else to do it :)  It's not real pretty but I love my barn-wish it was twice the size.



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We're in the process of having one built by DTC Barn Builders. It's a 36x40 and we're adding a 12 ft lean to on the side the slider doors are on.  It's just going to have 3 stalls and a tack room so I have room for some square bales on one side.  They bid it at 11,600 but we aren't doing the wainscoting.

Edited by newracer 2015-01-13 3:55 PM



Good Grief!


Posts: 6343
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TACKyPaints - 2015-01-14 2:50 PM
mruggles - 2015-01-13 3:41 PM
TACKyPaints - 2015-01-14 2:31 PM

mruggles - 2015-01-13 3:27 PM i guess you could call mine a modular and its has been great and i have never had an issue..............i went a lot of years with no barn so its very nice to have..:)



Okay couple questions!



1) Did it cost you an arm and a leg? Because a couple of the modulars I priced out were just as expensive (sometimes more) than a post frame building from a place like FBI or Morton.



2) I refuse to pay to have any sort of concrete poured so, is your barn secured to the ground? I can't tell from your pics. The thought of a barn just "sitting" there scares me! lol



3) Obviously you get cold & snow, do you find it to be secure enough inside from snow/drafts, etc?



4) Who did you order your barn from?

 
 base price was 17,995.............no concrete at all...and it has anchors......and i got mine insulated and when i have 5 horses inside and its -40 with the wind blowing, its very comfortable in the barn.......and its from affordable barns in sask..............



p.s.i priced out every option i could think of and this was by far the cheapest up here...it took them 4 days to put it up and it usually takes them 3 but we got hit by a snowstorm



m
Wow! Three to four days assembly would be amazing!



Okay, well if it's warm enough where you are then I'd say it should work here in IL. :)



Maybe I'll have to look into steel modulars more closely & do a little more research on them. thanks so much!





 

your welcome....



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newracer - 2015-01-13 3:54 PM We're in the process of having one built by DTC Barn Builders. It's a 36x40 and we're adding a 12 ft lean to on the side the slider doors are on.  It's just going to have 3 stalls and a tack room so I have room for some square bales on one side.  They bid it at 11,600 but we aren't doing the wainscoting.


Wow! Is that just for the building, labor only, or building & labor?

Military family

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TACKyPaints - 2015-01-13 3:51 PM

trobertson - 2015-01-13 3:41 PM We bought old Chicken house trusses (steel) and built ours that way. We built a 40x60 barn at a $125 per truss totalling 12 trusses. That is not counting the tin or the lumber. It maybe something you consider.


Where would I go about looking for old chicken house trusses? I have not a clue where to start! lol 

Chicken house trusses are pretty regional. Here in SW Missouri we see them on Craigslist all the time.
You might search your local Craigslist farm and garden section for trusses and see what turns up.

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Damn Yankee


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Location: Somewhere between raising hell and Amazing GraceWe got lucky with ours.  When we bought our current property it had a 30 by 40 foot metal building already on it.  Full concrete floor.  I did NOT like the idea of them on concrete, but we made do with it.  Hubby literally build the entire of the inside, stalls and all, 100 percent by himself.  From March 29th of 2013 until June 2013 when I came out with the horses.  And with mats down, the concrete has been a blessing.  The horses don't seem the least bit bothered by it at all.

 



(barn1.jpg)



(barn2.jpg)



(barn3.jpg)



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Right now on our craigslist, there are 2 40ft by 100 foot chicken houses for sale for $5250 each. It's unclear to me if they are already taken apart or not. They are a bit short for horses, but a construction friend of mine says you can put them on a concrete footing to make them taller or build a stem wall (I think is what he called it)
http://springfield.craigslist.org/grq/4844949121.html

Here's a 60 foot long for $3250
http://springfield.craigslist.org/grq/4834750802.html



Edited by bennie1 2015-01-13 6:50 PM


Elite Veteran



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bennie1 - 2015-01-13 6:47 PM Right now on our craigslist, there are 2 40ft by 100 foot chicken houses for sale for $5250 each. It's unclear to me if they are already taken apart or not. They are a bit short for horses, but a construction friend of mine says you can put them on a concrete footing to make them taller or build a stem wall (I think is what he called it) http://springfield.craigslist.org/grq/4844949121.html Here's a 60 foot long for $3250 http://springfield.craigslist.org/grq/4834750802.html


Hmmm, good ole' Craigslist.  I'll have to look into that and see if I can find any near by!


 

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Location: ILThank so much to everyone who has posted a pic or commented!! I really appreciate it! 

Elite Veteran



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missroselee - 2015-01-13 6:43 PM We got lucky with ours.  When we bought our current property it had a 30 by 40 foot metal building already on it.  Full concrete floor.  I did NOT like the idea of them on concrete, but we made do with it.  Hubby literally build the entire of the inside, stalls and all, 100 percent by himself.  From March 29th of 2013 until June 2013 when I came out with the horses.  And with mats down, the concrete has been a blessing.  The horses don't seem the least bit bothered by it at all.



 


 Wow!! Very lucky!! That's a nice building!!

Unfortunately there were only two building on our property when we moved here.  There's an old corn crib that would cost probably just as much to convert as it would to build new. And there was an old barn on the property. Had concrete blocks about 4-5 ft up and then wood rest of the way. Had a HUGE loft and would have been a nice barn had the prior owners maintained it.  The roof had a huge hole in it for many years and the rain and elements had rotted the trusses. On top of that, the owners had decided to try and convert it to a body shop and cut through important supporting beams and had things dangeroulsy "rigged up."  So yet another building that would have required a small fortune to make useable.  We just recently knocked the barn down this August to make room for a new building. But I suppose that's what ya gotta work with when you purchase a foreclosure home. On the plus side we got a place in the country, by a dirt road (perfect to exercise horses down), on 5 acres for an incredible price.  So, silver lining I suppose!




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TACKyPaints - 2015-01-13 3:59 PM

newracer - 2015-01-13 3:54 PM We're in the process of having one built by DTC Barn Builders. It's a 36x40 and we're adding a 12 ft lean to on the side the slider doors are on.  It's just going to have 3 stalls and a tack room so I have room for some square bales on one side.  They bid it at 11,600 but we aren't doing the wainscoting.

Wow! Is that just for the building, labor only, or building & labor?

Building and labor but we will do the inside ourselves, build the stalls, wiring, concrete, etc.

Elite Veteran



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newracer - 2015-01-13 9:29 PM
TACKyPaints - 2015-01-13 3:59 PM

newracer - 2015-01-13 3:54 PM We're in the process of having one built by DTC Barn Builders. It's a 36x40 and we're adding a 12 ft lean to on the side the slider doors are on.  It's just going to have 3 stalls and a tack room so I have room for some square bales on one side.  They bid it at 11,600 but we aren't doing the wainscoting.

Wow! Is that just for the building, labor only, or building & labor?
Building and labor but we will do the inside ourselves, build the stalls, wiring, concrete, etc.

Wow!! That's an amazing price!! Wish they did work in our area! :(


Take a Picture


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I have two of these buildings. This is the first one that I had built. It is actually 2 two car carports together. It cost about $2000. It has room for 3- 12 X 12 stalls but I only put up two stalls in it the other one has 2-10 X 12 stalls in it. It is HOT here and I did not want walls but you can have them closed in any way you want.

The second one I had built in another pasture is a two car carport which is actually almost as big as the first one. Cost about $1000. I found a guy on craigslist to build it so much cheaper.

The first building withstood hurricane winds of around 80 mph with absolutely no damage. Who in the heck would have thought we would have had a hurricane in NORTH EAST TX??? I hope I never have to go through that again.

Edited by streakysox 2015-01-13 11:25 PM




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TACKyPaints - 2015-01-13 2:08 PM We've discussed buying a small pole barn kit but my husband thinks doing the trusses will be a pain....any opinions on that for those of you that built your own?


We built our own and it was a LOT of work - the next time, I would at LEAST buy a nail gun. We hammered all the nails by HAND. We had a 30 X 40 pole barn kit from Sutherlands. 
Sours: http://forums.barrelhorseworld.com/forum/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=458508&start=21

You will also be interested:

Notice: For maximum wind load, buildings must be installed to the above specs.

We Build the Best for You!

Our steel trusses are manufactured by certified welders and are engineered to meet Alabama and Florida requirements of a 140-mph wind load and a 20 lbs. per square foot snow load when set on 6 x 6 posts at 10-foot centers.  We use 2 x 2 x 3/16 angle for both the top and bottom cords with 1 x 1 x 1/8 webbing.

These trusses are intended for agricultural use. If permitting is needed for your project, please call to discuss our engineered trusses before purchase.

Pole Barn Pricing*

20’ x 20’ $ 2686.94
20’ x 24’ $ 2,901.70
20’ x 30’ $ 3,618.76
20’ x 36’ $ 3960.59
24’ x 24’ $ 3,334.44
24’ x 30’ $ 4,154.51
24′ x 36′ $ 4,521.64
30’ x 30’ $ 4,853.47
30’ x 36’ $ 5,309.41
30’ x 40’ $ 6,145.99
40’ x 40’ $ 7653.95
40’ x 50’ $ 9,163.27
40’ x 60’ $ 10,051.44
40’ x 80′ $ 13,836.65
40’ x 100’ $ 17,000.70

*All pricing based on a 12’ eave height with galvalume 29-gauge metal roofing. Please contact us for information on 50’ spans and enclosed type barns. Prices are subject to change due to material fluctuations. Above prices current as of : 9-2-2021

Sours: https://www.southalabamametal.com/our-trusses/


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