Northwestern medicine interview questions

Northwestern medicine interview questions DEFAULT

COVID Resource Center

Yes, all prospective candidates may only apply to the NMH PGY1 Pharmacy Residency Program by registering for the ASHP Match Program and submitting application materials to PhORCAS. No supplemental materials are required.

Our service component of the residency provides valuable experience for residents to gain independence and to practice clinical skills outside of rotation. PGY1 residents will work every 6th weekday evening (rotating schedule), every third weekend, and one major winter holiday. PGY1 residents are not required to staff minor holiday weekends. PGY2 residents will work one major winter holiday and one summer holiday.

Graduates from NMH residency programs have been very successful. Many of our past residents have pursued PGY2 or fellowship training in areas such as administration, hematology/oncology, cardiology, solid organ transplant, critical care, ambulatory care, emergency medicine, drug information, informatics, medication safety and infectious diseases. Approximately 80 percent of our current pharmacist preceptors and departmental leaders completed residency or fellowship training. Nearly half of these did so at NMH. Approximately 50 percent of our preceptors are board certified in various areas.

Many residents choose to live close to the hospital and walk or take public transportation to work. Many high-rise apartment buildings are available around the area. Chicago has a very convenient public transportation system, and most residents do not bring their cars to Chicago. Downtown Chicago is very safe and walkable, with most necessities within walking distance. After you match with us, you will receive an email with a housing guide from current residents.

No. Each year we match with students from all over the country, from west coast to east coast. Each of our residents have different interests and backgrounds and we consider all residency applicants regardless of geography.

Residents are required to take and pass the NAPLEX and the Illinois MPJE. After you match with us, you will receive instructions on how to obtain licensure from us. Residents are encouraged to obtain licensure as soon as possible.

Yes. Our pharmacy department has a strong, collaborative relationship with other health care professionals. Pharmacists actively participate in interdisciplinary rounds, and are involved in all P&T decision making processes. Pharmacists oversee therapeutic drug monitoring, including antibiotic dosing and anticoagulation. Residents will be benefit from the exemplary learning environment at NMH.

Because of our unique integrated practice model, residents graduating from our program are competent in both clinical and operational aspects of pharmacy practice. Residents have the opportunity to interact with multiple preceptors during one rotation, and learn from different teaching styles. Being in a large residency class, residents establish a broad network early in their career and meet new people from different backgrounds. Many NMH pharmacists serve on committees of local and national pharmacy organizations, also presenting networking opportunities. Residents also have the opportunity to participate in professional pharmacy organization committees longitudinally.

Unfortunately, we currently do not arrange any events for prospective candidates to do on-site visits. We also do not offer a pre-interview shadowing experience. Follow us on our Instagram account for upcoming informational sessions and other program highlights: @nmhpharmacyresidency

Our PGY1 program does not participate in PPS. If you are interested in learning more about us, feel free to attend one of our informational sessions (shared on our Instagram account @nmhpharmacyresidency) and at the ASHP Midyear residency showcase.

Each year, we are extremely encouraged by the number of highly qualified applicants. It is always a tremendous challenge to identify the number of candidates for onsite interview. We review all applications submitted prior to deadline, and carefully evaluate each application. Based on the evaluation, some candidates will be invited to complete a pre-recorded video interview. After the pre-recorded video interview phase is completed, selected applicants will be invited for a live virtual interview during February. We try our best to coordinate interview days based on candidates' availability. During the interview, candidates will meet with residency program director, coordinator, preceptors, other departmental leaders, and current residents. There will be plenty of opportunities for candidates to ask us questions on interview day.

No, we do not require an additional letter. We only require the standard PhORCAS reference form. If your reference writers include a narrative letter within the PhORCAS reference form, we will read it. Please do not mail or email us a separate reference letter.

Yes, they do. Currently, the PGY2 programs that participate in early commit include ambulatory care, cardiology, critical care, emergency medicine, solid organ transplant, and oncology. NMH PGY1 residents who are interested in those PGY2 programs can declare interest prior to Midyear in accordance with the early commitment policy.

There were minor changes made to some of the learning experiences at the beginning of the pandemic. This included some remote work, with heavy reliance on use of virtual software to communicate with preceptors, patients, and providers. However, this was minimal and most learning and service experiences took place per usual with extra social distancing and PPE precautions. Residents were never removed from learning experiences to help maintain pharmacy operations.

Sours: https://www.nm.org/for-medical-professionals/i-am-a-resident-or-fellow/pharmacy-residency-programs/frequently-asked-questions

northwestern medicine Interview Questions and Answers

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Sours: https://www.justcrackinterview.com/interviews/northwestern-medicine/
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NORTHWESTERN CAREER ADVANCEMENT

Many interviews start with some form of this question. Use it as your opportunity to showcase what you want an employer to know about you that&#;s relevant to the position. An easy model to help you formulate your response is Present-Past-Future.

  • Present: To start, introduce (or reintroduce) yourself, including what and where you&#;re studying and your expected graduation date. Your interviewer may be aware of these, but it&#;s information you know well, helping you establish confidence.
  • Past: Next, choose two or three examples from your experiences that align with the role&#;s qualifications, showcase your skills, and give you a competitive edge. What information should the interviewer know about you to make a hiring decision?
  • Future: Wrap up by talking about why you&#;re excited about the role or why you are a strong fit.

Sample Response:

"I&#;m a junior at Northwestern University in communication studies. I was introduced to the influence of data in decision-making in one of my courses, and I was intrigued by how data was used to help a company position its product. I led a case study with a team of four other students that analyzed the data set to generate recommendations. I pursued this type of work further last summer at Invento, a local startup. After a presentation to clients, I was humbled when they opted to move forward with my recommendation. To date, the client has reported increased conversion of site traffic to establishing accounts. I&#;m excited to share more regarding my experiences and how they align with the needs of this position."

Personal Questions

  • Tell me about yourself.
  • Walk me through your resume.
  • What short and long-term goals have you set for yourself, and how do you plan to achieve them?
  • What two or three accomplishments have given you the most satisfaction?
  • What are your strengths and weaknesses?
  • What is the most important lesson you've learned in or outside school?

Education Questions

  • Why did you choose your major?
  • How have your studies helped you prepare for this position?
  • What has been your favorite or least favorite course, and why?

Questions about the Company

  • Why &#;are you interested in this organization?
  • Why are you the best person for this position?
  • What challenges are you looking for in a position?
  • What do you expect from a supervisor?

Questions about your experience

  • What are your team-player qualities? Give examples.
  • What is your approach to handling conflict? Solving problems?
  • Describe a leadership role you held and why you committed time to it.
  • What work experience has been the most valuable to you?
  • What was the most useful criticism you received, and who provided it?
  • How did you decide which extracurricular activities to join? What did you gain from these experiences?
  • What types of situations put you under pressure? How do you deal with pressure?

Behavioral Questions

  • Describe the project or situation that best demonstrates your analytical skills.
  • Describe a situation where you had a conflict with another person and how you handled it.
  • Give an example of a problem you solved and the process you used to arrive at the solution.
  • Describe an idea that you developed and implemented that you felt was particularly creative or innovative.
  • Tell me about a difficult decision you have made.
  • Give an example of a situation in when you failed and how you handled it.
  • Tell me about a time when you had to persuade another person to see your point of view.
  • Tell me about a project you initiated.

Sample questions to ask the employer

  • What does success look like in this position, and how do you measure it?
  • What are the top priorities and accomplishments expected of this role over the next year?
  • What&#;s different about working here compared to other places you&#;ve worked?
  • What are the challenges someone in this position will face?
  • How will my performance be evaluated?
  • According to the job description, you&#;re looking for candidates with strong analytical abilities. Can you tell me how your employees use these skills in their work?
  • How would you describe the company&#;s culture and work environment ?
  • What does a typical day or week look like?
  • What are typical assignments for new employees?
  • How has {business trend or current event} affected your work?
  • Can you outline a typical career path in your organization?
  • How does the organization support professional development and ongoing training?
  • What qualities are most important in order to excel in this role?
  • What are the short- and long-term strategic directions of the organization?
  • What do you like most about working here?
  • What are the next steps in the hiring process?
Sours: https://www.northwestern.edu/careers/jobs-internships/interviewing/common-interview-questions.html
Tell Me About Yourself: How to Answer this Medical School Interview Question

Northwestern Memorial Hospital Interview Questions

  • 1.

    If Northwestern Memorial Hospital hired you today, what would you accomplish first?

      When you start a new position, it is essential to set a goal on how you will make a positive impact quickly after being hired. Tell the interviewer what your impact goal is, should you be the successful candidate. If you want to make an impact with your answer, refer to the immediate needs of the company such as increasing budgets, or improving patient care, for instance.

      Michelle's Answer

      "When we were speaking earlier, you mentioned that you were urgently seeking to improve the level of patient care and compassion at this facility. I want to offer my strong skills when it comes to building patient rapport and help to improve the satisfaction of everyone that uses the services of Northwestern Memorial Hospital. I plan to make a positive impact very quickly."

      Michelle's Answer

      "This question is a delicate one, and you need to show respect for the onboarding process, then give a moderately ambitious project that you could execute. This concept is often called your 'value proposition' in marketing. "Hire me because I'll do X."

      But remember this is your campaign promise, if hired, it will likely be your first target to hit and depending on the environment, it could make or break you. The best approach is to give a functional analysis of the employers' needs and your skills."

  • 2.

    What type of work environment do you dislike working in?

      Are you pretty flexible in your ability to work in most environments? Have you experienced a position where the atmosphere wasn't conducive to your productivity? Be sure to know the type of situation offered in this position prior, to the interview. If you aren't completely clear on the workplace environment or culture, kindly ask the interviewer to expand on the work environment for you.

      Michelle's Answer

      "I can be productive in most work environments, so long as the mentality is positive and teamwork is encouraged. I cannot work in an environment that feels negative or toxic."

      Michelle's Answer

      "I prefer to focus on the positive, so if it's okay, I would like to share with you what my ideal work environment looks like. My ideal environment is organized, collaborative, positive, energetic, and encouraging. I love working with like-minded people who set challenging goals for themselves. I thrive when I work for supervisors who encourage curiosity and creativity in problem-solving."

  • 3.

    Rate your problem solving skills from How do you justify your rating?

      The interviewer wants to know how you would rate your problem-solving skills. Of course, you want to give yourself a strong rating; however, it's essential that you remain realistic. Everyone has room to learn and improve! Be sure to justify your score as well.

      Michelle's Answer

      "I rate my problem-solving skills as an 8/ I will, on occasion, have times when I am not as efficient as I would like to be but all in all, I do feel that my problem-solving skills are above average. My supervisor and co-workers will attest to my fast reflexes when a problem arises, and they would also say that I remain calm under pressure."

      Michelle's Answer

      "I would say I get a solid on a scale of Seems weird to give myself something like a .3, but I think of it as an 83%, which is a B- teetering on a solid B. It's a solid grade, with definite room for improvement, since I'm certainly not perfect. The reason for the B-/B grade would be that I'm quick to take action and figure out the solution as I go, but sometimes I could benefit from taking a moment to pause and reflect or gather other contributors before taking action. That said, I believe I generally get the best outcome possible when faced with a challenge."

      Anonymous Answer

      "I would give myself 8/10 only because everyone has room for improvement. When a problem comes to me, I am quick to take action and figure out the solution, but if I can't solve that, I would reach out and find someone that could assist me."

      Lauren's Answer

      This is a very strong rating, which is fantastic. You have a strong sense of self, and I would like to highlight that.

      "I rate my problem-solving skills an 8/ I work well in stressful situations and become proactive versus reactive when addressing a problem or issue. I can always learn new ways to resolve problems, and I welcome opportunities to broaden my skills."

      Was this answer helpful? or

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  • 4.

    Northwestern Memorial Hospital has a diverse workforce. When have you worked amongst a diverse group of people?

      Are you accustomed to working with a very large or diverse team of individuals? Assure the interviewer that you can handle an environment that offers diversity. Even better, give an example of being able to embrace diversity in the workplace.

      Michelle's Answer

      "I have worked with diverse groups of people most of my career, including my time in University. I am most comfortable, and happy, in this type of environment because it offers me unique learning opportunities."

      Michelle's Answer

      "I am so glad you pointed out your need for diversity at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. I greatly value diversity. I grew up in a fairly homogeneous town in Montana. When I hit my 20's, it was so important to me to learn about other cultures. I worked with community volunteer organizations in Peru, inner-city Chicago, and Russia."

  • 5. What is one thing you would change in your current job? The interviewer wants to know what element of your job that might be causing you to look for another. Also, if there is a problem, the interviewer also wants to see if you can come to the table with a solution. Example #1: "We are using a really old electronic medical record system. It is frustrating, because it doesn't work the way a more modern one would and it takes a lot of time to navigate. I started researching what some of the larger systems have and they are really expensive, I think. I pinged somebody in our government relations area to see if there were any grants that a smaller facility could be part of. Last I heard, they did find an applicable grant and we are now trying to get funding for the new EMR system." Example #2: "For example: "We have a seniority based process for determining who works holidays. This makes it really hard for new people who come in because they get last pick. I recommended a different process where we rotate each year who gets what holiday and that way it is fair. Then, when new people start, they don't feel like they are given last choice and will feel better about working here."6. It is often said that a career in healthcare is a 'thankless job'. How can we keep you motivated and engaged, even on the days when you feel your work goes unnoticed? The interviewer would like to know how they could continue to motivate you - even on the hardest of days. Do you need to have verbal recognition? Are you motivated solely by the success of your team? Talk to the interviewer about how you have stayed motivated in the past. Example #1: "I am an easily motivated individual, and it does not take much to keep me engaged. I am fully aware that healthcare-related positions can seem thankless. Honestly, the best thanks that I can get is a pat on the back now and then. The majority of my motivation comes from simply helping people." Example #2: "My chosen career was helping people at exactly the point they were least capable of censoring themselves or giving back. So, I stopped needing thanks from my patients. It's not like I don't need positive reinforcement. Everyone does. But I made a point to find it in other places instead of expecting it from my patients. Nowadays I make an effort to expressly thank the people I work with when they do a good job. I focus on being grateful to be allowed to see private, raw, emotional parts of peoples lives. And I make work-related goals I can achieve for satisfaction."7. What is an idea you have brought to the table to make you more efficient in your job. Everybody is looking to do more with less. Creating efficiencies is key in any job. Tell the interviewer, even if it is something small, something you've done to save time so you have more for the most important pieces of your work. Example #1: "To save time, I started using OneNote for lists that I need to make versus paper notes. I can email them to other people and cross them off as I go eliminating the need for post-its that could get lost or ignored. I can also assign myself dates to ensure the tasks get done." Example #2: "I noticed I was responding to emails frequently throughout the day, distracting me from the other projects I needed to do. I started blocking off 2 times each day where I would respond to emails and noticed a huge increase in my productivity. I could actually focus on my work instead of all of the emails coming in."8. Think about a difficult boss, professor or coworker. What made him or her difficult? How did you successfully interact with this person? Show the interviewer that you work well with most personalities even though you recognize there are some folks out there who are quite difficult to please. Think about that one person at work who is seen as hard to please. Perhaps there is someone at work who tries to intimidate others. Talk to the interviewer about what made this person challenging and what their relationship was with you. Avoid speaking poorly of anyone and be sure to end your response on a positive note. Example #1: "I once worked at a small medical facility where the primary physician was very demanding. When he would walk into the facility, employees would quietly announce that he was in the building, so that everyone could be prepared for his arrival. This physician had great intentions; however, his people skills were a little rough. I could see that he meant well, and I recognized that he wanted to do a lot of good things. When we interacted, I always took his feedback with the understanding that he didn't mean things as harshly as he might say them." Example #2: "In my previous position, I did have a coworker who didn't pull their weight. This unmotivated coworker created more work for the rest of the team by being slow and unresponsive. Our team started to complete most of the tasks when it came to group projects. It didn't take much time before our department head noticed this particular individual was slacking. I feel like, in most instances, the underachievers will weed themselves out over time, and it's rarely worth making a fuss over."9. Northwestern Memorial Hospital was initially looking for someone with 5 years' experience in a similar role. Considering you have just 2 years' experience, would you be willing to accept this position at a lower salary? Are you willing to earn your way up if the interviewer does not want to offer you top compensation? Discuss with the interviewer what you would expect for compensation if offered this position. Example #1: "I would be happy to earn my way to the top compensation level if required. I do assure you that, despite my being shy of experience by a couple of years, I am a top performer and you would not be disappointed in my performance." Example #2: "I understand I do not quite meet the qualifications of experience you are looking for and am willing to be compensated in adjustment to that fact. However, I do look forward to proving my worth to Northwestern Memorial Hospital in hopes to be considered for the median salary for the role." Do you think it is possible to be a good team member, yet disagree with the leader? The interviewer wants to know that you can be diplomatic in the workplace, even when you may not agree with your leader. Show the interviewer that it is possible for you to be a good team member, yet disagree with the leader from time to time. Explain that you believe everyone is entitled to their own professional opinion, yet capable of maintaining respect for each other at the same time. Show that even if you disagree with the final decision they make, you support the direction the team is heading. Example #1: "I think that it is possible to be a great team member, even when disagreeing with the leader. It's all in how you maintain respect for each other despite the difference in opinion." Example #2: "I believe that being a good team member is more about attitude than it is about compatibility. You do not need to agree with everyone % of the time, to be effective in your job." Why do you think you will be successful in this role with Northwestern Memorial Hospital? Rather than just sharing how you have gone above and beyond expectations in the past, focus on how your qualities will help you to meet and exceed expectations with Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Discuss the reasons why will you be great at this job. Talk about your qualifications and skills that will help you to do this job well. If you can, match your strengths to the requirements outlined in the job description. Example #1: "I know I will be successful in this role because I have been working in this industry for five years with great training and mentorship. I have a solid understanding of X, Y, and Z (skills listed in the job description). Also, I have all of my updated certifications as outlined in your job description. I am well-prepared for this next step in my career." Example #2: "I believe my success with Northwestern Memorial Hospital will come from having all of the hard skills that you are looking for, whether learned in school or gained through work experience. I know all the key players in this region and stay informed of best practices." Here is an anonymous answer example: "i believe my success with the northwestern memorial hospital will come from my experience in working as a pharmacy tech and a prior authorization tech." In response to the anonymous answer example, here is what Lauren McCabe said: Great start. You have transferable work experience, but I would add more detail in order for you to stand out. An interviewer is interested in knowing you can do the job, but how you do the job as well. In response to the anonymous answer example, here is a revised answer from Lauren McCabe: "I believe my previous experience as a Pharmacy Tech and an Authorization Tech will significantly assist my success at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. I have a natural affinity for people, as I love interacting with patients. I would like to bring my personality and skillset to this position." With the ongoing changes in the healthcare services industry, how do you keep your knowledge current? Employers expect employees to stay up-to-date on their respective field, and today's technology makes this reasonably easy! List several ways that you receive your industry knowledge and stay on top of trends. Tell the interviewer about those daily update emails you receive from professional organizations, conferences you attend, and seminars you have taken. Lastly, it's a great idea to ask the interviewer what resources they refer to for industry trends. That question can start up a great conversation, and you may learn a thing or two as well. Example #1: "Every morning I listen to X Podcast because I find the information to be fresh, and valuable. In addition to this podcast, I also subscribe to a couple of industry blogs. One is ABC, and the other is XYZ. I greatly value the information shared between fellow professionals. What resources do you prefer to stay on top of industry trends and changes?" Example #2: "I am an avid fan of google alerts! I will receive an email with the related information any time there is a major headline about the healthcare services industry. In addition to this, I also subscribe to a couple of medical-related journals." If you could expand your knowledge and expertise in any healthcare service area, which would you choose? There are many facets of health care. If you could choose any area of healthcare to specialize in, which would you choose? Be sure to tie your answer into some aspects of what Northwestern Memorial Hospital does. Example #1: "If I could choose any area of healthcare services to be a subject matter expert in, I would choose geriatric care. I do feel that this particular focus is not as popular as some, and become an expert in it would allow me to snowball in my career." Example #2: "I have a variety of interests within healthcare service, so that is a tough question for me! I suppose if I had to narrow it to just one area of expertise, I would say palliative care and the necessary family care that comes with it." What do you like most about your current position? The interviewer wants to see that spark when you talk about your favorite aspect of your role. If you are a new grad, feel free to use an internship experience. The interviewer will also be looking to see if the open position has some of the elements you really like included. Example #1: "My favorite part of the job is the age of the patients I work with. I absolutely love working with senior citizens. I am learning so much from them and I truly enjoy making their lives richer and fuller." Example #2: "I love working for a small company. You truly feel like you can own the work and changes can be made very quickly as opposed to many layers of approval. I truly feel like I'm making a difference." Do you prefer to work in a team based position or individually? In which situation are you the happiest and most productive? Talk to the interviewer about your preference when it comes to teamwork or working individually. Be sure to avoid pigeonholing yourself into one particular scenario (IE: I only like to work by myself). You may work well without the need for much management or direction, or perhaps you are better driven in a collaborative and team led environment. Either way, be honest with the interviewer about your preferences without leaning negatively, either way. Example #1: "Whether I am doing an independent project, or working in a team environment, I always give my best. I enjoy the camaraderie of working in a team, but I can be successful working autonomously as well." Example #2: "I have found, in the past, that I work well in an individually driven environment; however, I can certainly be productive in a team-based setting as well." Walk me through a difficult situation you've had with a customer or patient. Whether or not you are in a patient care role, we've all worked with a difficult customer. Describe the situation, your action, and the outcome, even if it wasn't good. Example #1: "I had an angry patient who didn't think the doctor was coming in enough to check on his wife. She was stable and the doctor typically did rounds in the morning. I explained to him that the doctor would be in the next morning and he got very upset and was yelling. I let him vent, listened, and told him that I could see he was very upset. I told him I would talk to my manager to let her know of the concerns. She was able to to reach the doctor and he made an extra trip over to her room. He then explained that he would't be back until the morning, but that he could be reached by the nurse if he was needed. I took the time to listen and he calmed down in the end." At Northwestern Memorial Hospital we seek to hire individuals who have ambitions of growing their career. Where do you see yourself in years? Every hiring manager would like to know that their investment of time and training will pay off. Assure the interviewer that you see this position as a long-term fit. How does this role with Northwestern Memorial Hospital fit into your longer-term plans? Example #1: "In years I would like to see my career with Northwestern Memorial Hospital include a path towards a leadership role. I am very keen on paving a long-term career in the healthcare services realm and would love the opportunity to do that here." Example #2: "One of the attractive points of working for Northwestern Memorial Hospital is that you care about the growth of your employees. I'm motivated to learn and am looking for a long-term fit. In years I'd like to be grounded in the clinic, learn about this site, your patient base and earn certifications that would help the unit advance. Personally, I'd like to get involved in some of the local volunteer organizations. I speak Spanish, and I have an interest in urban outreach so it would be nice to do something formal in that contexthealth-education or fundraising." Healthcare service companies require strong organizational skills and attention to detail. How do you ensure that your work is properly organized, and highly accurate? The success of the healthcare industry thrives on the accuracy of information, and organization. Talk to the interviewer about the ways that you ensure accuracy and organization in your day to day activities. Perhaps you use a particular app or software. Maybe you are a pen and paper person. Whatever your method, be sure to highlight that you are successful in organizing your day. Example #1: "I am a highly detailed person, and I thrive on having a high level of organization in my day. This organization includes my scheduling, paperwork, and more. If I am offered a position with Northwestern Memorial Hospital you will never find me to be disorganized! I utilize my Outlook calendar and set alerts for myself for deadlines and important activities. My documentation is strong as well." Example #2: "I'm a bit of a nerd. I carry around a notebook and write down important facts if I think there is a chance I will forget them. But this is usually just for transitions. Every clinic I've ever worked in has its way of communicating and recording facts, so I put time and attention into using the system the people around me are using. That way its easier to transition care and the patient has all their info in the same place. My notebook saves me when I'm swamped, but I try to be efficient and put info directly into the [group record/EMR/chart] when I can." What is your patient care philosophy? It's always a great idea to research the company before your interview. You want to get to know their care philosophy so that your answer can reflect what is important to them. What is the core of your care philosophy? Keep your answer concise yet sincere. Example #1: "Every day at work, I remind myself that everyone I come across has their struggles. Every person we care for has a story. I make sure to get to know my patients whenever possible. Everyone has the right to compassionate care." Example #2: "I have three philosophies when it comes to my work. One for the clinic, one for me, and one for the patient. First, I work in a system, and I respect that. I follow the rules, I maintain my certifications, and I appreciate the policies and values of whatever site I work. Patient care is a privilege, and I respect the role I have in clinical care and the part other people have. Second, I want to be the best at what I do. Every day I learn something, and that's because I choose to get better. Last, I adapt to the individual. If I'm meeting the requirements of my position, and evolving within my profession, then I am free to adjust to my patient and be the provider they need. Some patients need a lot of attention; some want less, and some need boundaries. I have trained myself to adapt my communication style, so a patient gets what they need." Some of our positions require you to assess a patient over the phone. What are some of the steps you take to make sure you get the information needed to determine next steps? Triaging over the phone is a really critical skill. Most health care systems have protocols, but the voice on the other end of the line makes a huge difference in putting that worried patient at ease or help them know what to do next. Show the interviewer how you have mastered this. Example #1: "I have worked in a pediatric clinic on the triage line. Most parents, especially new parents, have so many questions about what is normal and what isn't. My number one strategy is to thank them for asking and not make them feel like it is just a little thing and that they shouldn't have called. My strategy is to listen, probe for more detail, and agree upon a solution they are comfortable with." Here is an anonymous answer example: "i would answer the line and assure the patient that i'm here to help and listen to what they need. make the patient feel comfortable." In response to the anonymous answer example, here is what Lauren McCabe said: This is a great answer. I assisted with providing a bit more depth. In response to the anonymous answer example, here is a revised answer from Lauren McCabe: "I try my best to build positive rapport with patients, whether it is in-person or over the phone. If I were assessing a patient over the phone, I would use a clear and warm tone. I would begin by explaining the purpose of the call so that the patient knows what to expect. I would try my best to help the patient feel comfortable and listen attentively to their responses. I would have a list of questions that were appropriate for their concerns and follow protocol to direct the patient to the next level of care." At Northwestern Memorial Hospital we seek to hire individuals who are passionate about health care. Tell me why you are passionate about health care. Assure the interviewer that you are dedicated to a meaningful career in the healthcare services industry. The hiring manager would like to know that this position fits into your long-term plan and that, if hired, you would stay with Northwestern Memorial Hospital as long as possible. Example #1: "My entire career has been dedicated to the healthcare services field. I find it incredibly rewarding and interesting because I get to help others and every day brings new challenges! One of the reasons I applied for this role with Northwestern Memorial Hospital is because I can see a long-term fit here. I plan to work in the healthcare segment for my entire career." Example #2: "I know this career can take a toll on personal life, and I understand that while it can be more-or-less sustainable, it's more than just a job for me. So far, I have dedicated my entire adult life to this career. I have shadowed numerous professionals and have worked multiple clinics. I know this is the right career for me." Example #3: "This career is not just something I want to do to get by; it's something I want to BE. I want to be someone who dedicates themselves to a craft. I chose healthcare because the learning opportunities are endless. It's constantly evolving. I find the human body is fascinating, and I think that society is only healthy when it cares for its wounded." Walk me through your training and how it led you to where you are now in your career. Take a few minutes to walk the interviewer through your formal post-secondary education as well as any on the job training. Talk about your most positive take-away's from your post-secondary experience and be sure to tie in how that experience will help you succeed in this position. Example #1: "I have a nursing degree as well as additional on the job training within clinical research. I feel that my nursing education opened up many potential industry-related avenues for me. I graduated top of my class and completed a valuable internship with 'XYZ Health Services'. All of these experiences have helped prepare me for success in this role with Northwestern Memorial Hospital." Example #2: "I did my undergraduate in chemistry and medical school at St. George's University. I loved surgery, so my electives were in general surgery, trauma epidemiology, and orthopedics. I'm happy to be moving on to more responsibility as a resident. I have had some amazing mentors, and I found that I could perform with some different teaching styles." Tell us about a time you went above and beyond for a patient. The interviewer wants to know that you won't be doing simply the bare minimum for your patients. The extra things make a difference. Give the interviewer a specific example of something you did that was extra special. Example #1: "I have a patient who comes in regularly to the clinic who is really into sports. I make sure the latest editions of Sports Illustrated are waiting for him to make the time go faster. He also loves our home town sports team, so I make sure to ask him questions about the team and he loves talking about it. Nobody wants to be sick, so anything I can do to make his day brighter, I want to do." Example #2: "For example: "I found out from his son that one of my patient's was a veteran. I thanked him for his service and asked him some general questions to get a sense on whether or not he wanted to talk about it. He gave me a lot of information, so each time I went back to his room, I asked more questions. He felt such pride talking about his service. We really connected and he told one of the other nurses, who happened to be my supervisor, that he really liked when I was his nurse. I am happy I could make him feel good." Example #3: "these skills are valued by reputable vendors, and I'd like to represent a company that wants to create long-term sustainable partnerships." In order to work for Northwestern Memorial Hospital, you must be able to pass a full criminal background check. Do you consent to a full background check? Working in the healthcare services industry means that you are in contact with vulnerable people, children, pharmaceutical drugs, drug-related equipment, confidential information, and other areas of sensitivity. Assure the interviewer that you are able and willing to pass a complete background check. If you have a criminal record, you must disclose this. Example #1: "I have a clean criminal record and am happy to comply with any background check you require of me." Example #2: "No problem. I understand that it's part of the job. But I want to be up-front, I have done a full background check before, and there is a possibility you will see a charge for possession of marijuana in the check. It was several years ago, and it's no longer an issue for me because I've made significant changes in my life to pursue this career. But I don't want you to be surprised by the information. I'm happy to answer any questions you have." If you could expand your knowledge and expertise in any area of healthcare services, which would you choose? The interviewer would like to dig deeper into your true areas of interest when it comes to healthcare services. They want to know that your passions align well with what Northwestern Memorial Hospital is offering. Talk to the interviewer about the areas of healthcare you would like to focus on most, and then tie that information in with what the position at Northwestern Memorial Hospital would be offering you. Example #1: "If I could expand my expertise in any healthcare service area I would choose anything within primary care. This is one of the reasons I have applied with your company. I feel that your focus will be a great fit with my long-term career goals." Example #2: "I'm interested in research. One of the things that attracted me to working with your company is your ongoing community-based research collaborations. I'd be curious to hear if the [clinic/hospital/program] had any needs in this area. Is this something junior staff can be involved in?" Have you ever been involved in ordering medical supplies, maintaining inventory, or other types of health care related administrative duties? The interviewer would like to know if you understand what it takes to keep on top of ordering medical supplies and inventory. Assure the interviewer that you are capable of foreseeing needs, and making the appropriate action. Highlight your ability to be responsible when it comes to related administrative tasks. Example #1: "I have experience in ordering medical supplies and maintaining inventory. I fully understand that there is an art to being properly organized when it comes to the availability of supplies. For medical ordering and inventory, I have used a variety of software and programs such as ABC and XYZ." Example #2: "Yes. I used to do this in my former position. I was responsible for maintaining supplies on the general surgery ward for five years. It was great at working behind the scenes with the result being efficiency for others." Northwestern Memorial Hospital seeks to hire those with strong problem solving skills. When were you able to successfully resolve a problem in the workplace? Problem-solving and dispute resolution are critical skills to possess. Display to the interviewer that you are capable of problem-solving within the workplace. Talk about a time when you were creative, proactive, and displayed the leadership qualities required to resolve a workplace issue. Example #1: "In my most recent position we had a consistent problem with employees showing up late for their shifts or calling in sick at the very last moment. Rather than the typical documenting and reprimanding style that management usually takes, I decided to track the results of an accountability reward system. For days, my employees were rewarded for coming to work 10 minutes early. Also, for every month with zero sick days, a bonus was added. In the end, we awarded those with perfect attendance a $ bonus. The bonus' cost us less money, in the end than the cost of lowered productivity due to absent employees. The program was a success, and upper management chose to keep it implemented for another six months. We will re-assess in December, but it seems to be working very well." Example #2: "I was working in a clinic where the primary population was low income. We had a lot of concerns with patients not showing up for appointments when expected. The staff wanted to start double-booking patient time slots. Instead, I got permission to spend a day in a highly-rated clinic serving the same population. Instead of scheduling, they had these 'drop-in mornings' with a common waiting room. I took these methods and incorporated them into our setting. We did that twice a week, and it completely solved our scheduling problem." How would you describe your personality? Personality and character are two very different things. The interviewer is looking for more information on your traits vs. your integrity. Your example could include buzzwords such as introverted, energetic, and confident. Example #1: "I would describe my personality as approachable, light-hearted, and positive. I believe that, if asked, my colleagues and supervisor would say the same about me." Example #2: "I'm genuinely easy-going, probably from all the international travel I experienced in my 20's. I like to do the right thing, and sometimes I get stressed trying to reach that goal, but I think it's a worthwhile endeavor. I can be funny, but my sense of humor is pretty dry, so people don't always know that about me when they first meet me." Here is an anonymous answer example: "i would describe my personality as very positive and happy to assist in any way. very determined and driven." In response to the anonymous answer example, here is what Lauren McCabe said: I really like your response. In a caring profession, interviewers want to see a level of skill and attentiveness. I included patient care and inner-office rapport building to supplement your response. In response to the anonymous answer example, here is a revised answer from Lauren McCabe: "I describe myself as a very positive, happy person who is always there to assist [patients and colleagues]. I love building strong relationships with my team members because it enhances the patient experience. I am extremely driven and passionate as well, and will go above and beyond to help others." Northwestern Memorial Hospital supports a healthy work/life balance for all employees. How do you balance life and work? It is essential to keep a healthy work/life balance to prevent burnout. Talk to the interviewer about how you can maintain that appropriate balance for yourself. Example #1: "I find that with the right company, it's pretty simple to balance life and work. When I enjoy what I do it doesn't feel like a chore. I am always sure that when at home, my family gets my attention first. I take time on the weekends to do things for myself and ensure that I regenerate before the work week begins." Example #2: "I make a strong effort to keep a healthy balance by spending my free time away from my cell phone and having more face-to-face time with my friends and family. I indulge in the things that make me happy, on my time off. By consistently rejuvenating in this way, I can give even more energy when I am at work." In your opinion, what makes you a great problem solver? Employers want to know that you have a methodical approach to problem-solving. Consider the skills and qualities that help you successfully face problems. Perhaps you have a keen eye for detail. Maybe you can see opportunity when others can only focus on the issue. Share your strengths as a problem solver, and your ability to come up with innovative solutions. Example #1: "I am a great problem solver because I do not allow stress to cloud my judgment and mute my sound decision making. I am a keen observer with a great memory which allows me to recall unique solutions or ideas." Example #2: "I believe I am a great problem solver because I am sure to gather as many facts as possible, I look at the problem and its potential solutions from multiple angles, and I am not afraid to make a creative decision that might seem off the beaten path." What is your greatest weakness? Pick a weakness that is not a core skill for this position. You can be candid in your answer; recognizing that you aren't great at something and acknowledging your need to improve. Be sure to have an action plan in place for improving on this weakness. Perhaps you are watching TED talks to gain skills in a particular area, reading the latest-and-greatest book on the subject, or maybe you are taking a seminar at a nearby community center. We are all human with our weaknesses, so don't be afraid to share yours! Example #1: "I believe I could improve on some technical skills including Excel and Word. Currently I am at a beginner to intermediate level; however, I would be more comfortable at an advanced level. I have enrolled myself in an evening/weekend workshop for the next six weeks. We will see how stellar my skills are after that course!" Example #2: "I know this will come off as cliche, but it's truthful. My weakness is in not delegating. I know what I want to be done and how I want it done, so it's often easier to do it myself. However, it can inhibit my ability to grow. I cannot take on every step of a project; I need to be able to give the task or a portion of it to another team member or direct report, let go of the control and know it will be taken care of. I've spoken with my current manager about it, and we've developed a system where he can call me out on the behavior since often I'm not aware of it. By bringing awareness to it at the moment, I find my propensity to hold onto control has decreased, so I'm certainly moving in the right direction." Here is an anonymous answer example: "i could improve on speaking up when something is not going right. usually, i would fix the issue and not address the problem." In response to the anonymous answer example, here is what Lauren McCabe said: This is a great, transparent answer. I made minor edits, but this is certainly something that can be improved upon. In response to the anonymous answer example, here is a revised answer from Lauren McCabe: "I can improve upon speaking up when something is wrong. I usually solve the issue versus addressing the underlying problem. I would like to have more opportunities to grow in this area."

  • 5.

    What is one thing you would change in your current job?

  • 6.

    It is often said that a career in healthcare is a 'thankless job'. How can we keep you motivated and engaged, even on the days when you feel your work goes unnoticed?

  • 7.

    What is an idea you have brought to the table to make you more efficient in your job.

  • 8.

    Think about a difficult boss, professor or coworker. What made him or her difficult? How did you successfully interact with this person?

  • 9.

    Northwestern Memorial Hospital was initially looking for someone with 5 years' experience in a similar role. Considering you have just 2 years' experience, would you be willing to accept this position at a lower salary?

  • Do you think it is possible to be a good team member, yet disagree with the leader?

  • Why do you think you will be successful in this role with Northwestern Memorial Hospital?

  • With the ongoing changes in the healthcare services industry, how do you keep your knowledge current?

  • If you could expand your knowledge and expertise in any healthcare service area, which would you choose?

  • What do you like most about your current position?

  • Do you prefer to work in a team based position or individually?

  • Walk me through a difficult situation you've had with a customer or patient.

  • At Northwestern Memorial Hospital we seek to hire individuals who have ambitions of growing their career. Where do you see yourself in years?

  • Healthcare service companies require strong organizational skills and attention to detail. How do you ensure that your work is properly organized, and highly accurate?

  • What is your patient care philosophy?

  • Some of our positions require you to assess a patient over the phone. What are some of the steps you take to make sure you get the information needed to determine next steps?

  • At Northwestern Memorial Hospital we seek to hire individuals who are passionate about health care. Tell me why you are passionate about health care.

  • Walk me through your training and how it led you to where you are now in your career.

  • Tell us about a time you went above and beyond for a patient.

  • In order to work for Northwestern Memorial Hospital, you must be able to pass a full criminal background check. Do you consent to a full background check?

  • If you could expand your knowledge and expertise in any area of healthcare services, which would you choose?

  • Have you ever been involved in ordering medical supplies, maintaining inventory, or other types of health care related administrative duties?

  • Northwestern Memorial Hospital seeks to hire those with strong problem solving skills. When were you able to successfully resolve a problem in the workplace?

  • How would you describe your personality?

  • Northwestern Memorial Hospital supports a healthy work/life balance for all employees. How do you balance life and work?

  • In your opinion, what makes you a great problem solver?

  • What is your greatest weakness?

  • Sours: https://www.mockquestions.com/company/Northwestern+Memorial+Hospital/

    Medicine interview questions northwestern

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    10 Residency Interview Questions and Answers - BeMo Academic Consulting

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