G jazz chords

G jazz chords DEFAULT

Jazz Guitar Chords

Learn Jazz Guitar Chords in 5 Easy Steps


Major 7 ChordsMinor 7 ChordsDominant 7 ChordsChord ProgressionsScales and Arpeggios

To most, jazz music on the guitar is a beautiful art form. Even those who don't appreciate the sounds of swing and bebop can respect the talent of the musicians who perform it, and acknowledge that their playing could benefit from learning some of the principles of the style.

The rub, however, is that jazz can seem intimidating -- even mystifying -- to newer players, to the point where they don't even give it a shot.

If you count yourself among the many who have wanted to dip their toes in the deep end of the jazz pool but felt too befuddled to give it a try, then we encourage you to read this guide.

Today, we're going to be providing and introduction to playing jazz music on the guitar, complete with the information you'll need to start learning jazz chords, playing jazz melodies, and memorizing the scales you'll need to improvise like a seasoned jazz professional.

Getting Started: Intro to Jazz Guitar Chords

Like any form of music, harmonies and rhythms are essential to jazz. The first thing we'll be covering are some basic chords that you'll see frequently throughout your endeavors in the genre. These include the Major 7, Minor 7, and Dominant 7 chords; we'll look at these variations in several keys to serve as examples.

Like any chord, the recommended fingerings we provide aren't the only way you can play them. They are a good starting point for beginners, though, so commit these versions to memory, then start exploring other fingerings to see what works for you.

You may find that you prefer playing some of these as bar chords, for example, and you're more than welcome to do so if you feel it fits the song or will make your playing more fluid. Stay open, and learn as many fingerings for your jazz chords as possible so that you can get to them from anywhere on the fretboard.

Lastly, the chords we'll be covering today are a good base to get started, but are by no means all the jazz-style chords existence. Don't hesitate to look up new chords as you encounter them to find the ones that work for you.

Major 7 Jazz Guitar Chords

This chord includes a scale's root, major third, perfect fifth, and major seventh tones. You'll often see Major 7 chords displayed with one of these symbols: maj7, M7, Δ, 7+. If you were playing a C Major 7 chord, for example, you'd play the notes C, E, G, and B. Here's how you'd tackle it in open position.

C Major 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

C Major 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Place your 1st finger on the 4th string/2nd fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 5th string/3rd fret
  • Place your 4th finger on the 1st string/3rd fret
  • Play strings 2 and 3 open
  • Mute string 6

Simple enough. Next, let's move on to G Major 7, which includes the notes G, B, D, and F#. Here's how it goes in open position.

G Major 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

G Major 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Place your 1st finger on the 6th string/3rd fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 4th string/4th fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 5th string/5th fret
  • Play strings 2 and 3 open
  • Mute string 1

Moving around the horn again, we have D Major 7, comprised of D, F#, A, and C#. Your open position fingering is as follows:

D Major 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

D Major 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Use your first finger to bar strings 1, 2, and 3, at the 2nd fret
  • Play string 4 open
  • Mute strings 5 and 6

Next up is A Major 7. Your notes for this one are A, C#, E, and G#. Here's an easy open position fingering for the chord:

A Major 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

A Major 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Place your 1st finger on the 3rd string/1st fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 4th string/2nd fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 2nd string/2nd fret
  • Place your 4th finger on the 1st string/4th fret
  • Play string 5 open
  • Mute string 6

Are you starting to get a feel for the Major 7 chord sound? Excellent. Remember that you can also use a bar chord to get to your Major 7 chords quickly. Your root note for these will always be on the 5th string, so if you were playing C Major 7, for instance:

C Major 7 Barre Jazz Guitar Chord

C Major 7 Barre Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Use your 1st finger to bar the strings on the 3rd fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 3rd string/4th fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 4th string/5th fret
  • Place your 4th finger on the 2nd string/5th fret
  • Mute string 6

Keep that same shape and move your bar up or down the fretboard, and you'll be playing the Major 7 chord for the note you're covering with your 1st finger on the 5th string. Now, with that out of the way, it's time to take a look at a few Minor 7 chords that will come in handy.

Minor 7 Jazz Guitar Chords

Minor 7 chords contain a scale's root, minor third, perfect fifth, and minor seventh tones. You'll see these represented as an m7 or -7 in your music. We'll start with D Minor 7, with the notes D, F, A, and C:

D Minor 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

D Minor 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Place your first finger over strings 1 and 2 on the 1st fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 3rd string/2nd fret
  • Play string 4 open
  • Mute strings 5 and 6

A Minor 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

A Minor 7 is another chord you'll see frequently. It includes the notes A, C, E, and G:

A Minor 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Place your 1st finger on the 2nd string/1st fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 4th string/2nd fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 3rd string/2nd fret
  • Place your 4th finger on the 1st string/3rd fret
  • Play string 5 open
  • Mute string 6

E Minor 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

Last up, we'll tackle E Minor 7, which uses E, G, B, and D:

E Minor 7 Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Place your 1st finger on the 5th string/2nd fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 2nd string/3rd fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 1st string/3rd fret
  • Play strings 3, 4, and 6 open

Again, you can use a bar for Minor 7 chords. We'll use A Minor 7 as an example for using string 6 as the root:

A Minor 7 Barre Jazz Guitar Chord (6th as root)

A Minor 7 Barre Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Use your 1st finger to bar the strings at the 5th fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 5th string/7th fret

D Minor 7 Barre Jazz Guitar Chord (5th as root)

If you prefer using the 5th string for your root notes, let D Minor 7 here be your guide:

D Minor 7 Barre Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Use your 1st finger to bar the strings at the 5th fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 2nd string/6th fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 4th string/7th fret
  • Mute string 6

Now, let's round out our chord introduction with a few Dominant 7 chords.

Dominant 7 Jazz Guitar Chords

When playing Dominant 7 chords, you'll be using a scale's root, major third, perfect fifth, and minor seventh tones. You'll recognize the symbol as the telltale "7" after the root note. We'll start with the C7 chord, which contains C, E, G, and Bb:

C7 Jazz Guitar Chord

C7 Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Place your 1st finger on the 4th string/2nd fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 5th string/3rd fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 3rd string/3rd fret
  • Place your 4th finger on the 1st string/3rd fret
  • Mute strings 2 and 6

Next is G7, which consists of G, B, D, and F:

G7 Jazz Guitar Chord

G7 Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Place your 1st finger on the 1st string/1st fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 5th string/2nd fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 6th string/3rd fret
  • Place your 4th finger on the 2nd string/3rd fret
  • Play strings 3 and 4 open

The last Dominant 7 chord we'll learn is D7. You'll need D, F#, A, and C for this one:

D7 Jazz Guitar Chord

D7 Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Place your 1st finger on the 2nd string/1st fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 3rd string/2nd fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 1st string/2nd fret
  • Play string 4 open
  • Mute strings 5 and 6

And of course, you can incorporate bar versions of Dominant 7 chords in your playing as well. For the root on string 6, take a look at G7 as an example

G7 Barre Jazz Guitar Chord (6th string root)

G7 Barre Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Use your 1st finger to bar the strings at the 3rd fret
  • Place your 2nd finger on the 3rd string/4th fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 5th string/5th fret

You can move the root to the 5th string as well. Here's how it would look using C7:

C7 Jazz Barre Guitar Chord (5th string root)

C7 Jazz Barre Jazz Guitar Chord

  • Use your 1st finger to bar the strings on the 3rd fret
  • Place your 3rd finger on the 4th string/5th fret
  • Place your 4th finger on the 2nd string/5th fret
  • Mute string 6

Don't forget to learn the Dominant 7 fingerings for your other keys as your encounter them. For now, though, let's talk about some the trickier jazz chords you'll come across on your journey.

Diving Deeper: Advanced Jazz Guitar Chords

The chords we touched on above are a great start, but they aren't the only chords you'll be encountering along your jazz journey. You'll be running into plenty of Augmented, Diminished, Sustained, 9, 11, and 13 chords (among others) so keep your chord library nearby and stay prepared to look up any chords you don't immediately recognize when you're learning a new song.

Essential Jazz Guitar Chord Progressions

You might already know that chord progressions are groups of chords commonly used in various song structures. When you're playing jazz, the two most important ones to remember are the ii-V-I and I-vi-ii-V progressions.

Remember that the "I" is your root, and the chord are formed in relation to that root chord (so you can always get to your chords in these progressions if you remember the root). Here's an example of the former, using the key of C as our root:

  • ii -- D Minor 7 Chord
  • V -- G7 Chord
  • I -- C Major 7 Chord

Using C as our root again, this is how you would create the latter progression:

  • I -- C Major 7 Chord
  • vi -- A Minor 7 Chord
  • ii -- D Minor 7 Chord
  • V -- G7 Chord

Take these progressions to heart, as they'll form the basis for much of the music you'll be playing.

Jazz Scales and Arpeggios

When it comes to playing melodies and improvising, learning your scales and arpeggios will go long way toward your success. Check the piece you're playing to identify the key (which will either be explicitly stated by the song's key signature or something you can derive from looking at a tune's first and last chords). Today, we'll take a look at two that you'll be crossing paths with frequently.

The Major Scale

Also known as the Ionian scale, your typical major scale will consist of 7 degrees (the eighth note in the scale is the same as the root, just an octave higher). The sequence of intervals between the notes in a major scale is whole-step, whole-step, half-step, whole-step, whole-step, whole-step, half-step. So, if we were playing in C Major, you'd use the following notes: C, D, E, F, G, A, B.

The Minor Scale

There are actually three main variants of minor scales (natural, harmonic, melodic), as opposed to just the one associated with major keys. What we'll be covering today is the Jazz Minor scale, a derivative of the melodic minor scale. We'll use C Jazz Minor as our example; see if you can pick out the relationship between the notes as you play: C, D. Eb, F, G, A, B. Your Jazz Minor scale will always contain that flat-third -- one of it's hallmarks -- and another way of thinking of this scale is as the ascending portion of your melodic minor scale.

Further "Notes" on Scales

Are there other scales you'll be using in jazz music? Naturally, but these two will get you started on playing melodies and improvising. You can start incorporating other scales as they become pertinent to your playing. You'll need to remember the position of your notes on the fretboard to execute any scale properly, so make sure you study your fretboard chart and memorize the positioning of your notes. Coincidentally, that memorization will also come in handy once it's time to start playing arpeggios...

Arpeggios

You can think of arpeggios as chords that you play broken up, note by note. If you to execute a C Major 7 arpeggio, for instance, you'd play C, E, G, and Bb. For a D Minor 7 arpeggio, you'd play D, F, A, and C. Heading to a G Dominant 7 arpeggio, you'd play G, B, D, and F. It's a simple concept, but incorporated into the jazz tunes you'll learn, it can have a profound effect on how your playing sounds.

Remember that the arpeggios you play will work best over their associated chords. If you know your chords, you can learn your arpeggios -- just make sure to practice your fingering so you can get to the notes you need without hassle.

Tackling Some Jazz Tunes

Ready to put it all you've learned today to the test? Try applying your newfound knowledge by playing these five classic jazz tunes:

  1. A Night in Tunisia
  2. Moanin'
  3. Willow Weep For Me
  4. Blue Bossa
  5. It's Only a Paper Moon

While you're learning these songs, keep these important points of jazz playing in mind:

  • Learn the melody first by reading your sheet music, tab, picking it up by ear.
  • Move on to the chords next, learning the progression, individual chords, and trying out different rhythms that fit the music best.
  • Try your hand a soloing by using the notes from the scale(s) associated with the song. Remember that your song might be written in a specific key, but jazz is notorious for changes, and you might have to switch the scale you're using mid-song to stay with the music. Watch those chord changes and you should be alright.

Jazz might seem tricky at first, but with time and practice, you'll be able to handle the complexities of this genres, and even apply what you learn to playing songs outside of jazz. The skills you pick up playing jazz make everything else easier, so good luck, and happy practicing!

Next Lesson:

Left Handed Guitar Chords

Sours: https://lessons.com/guitar-lessons/guitar-chords/jazz-guitar-chords

15 Easy Beginner Jazz Guitar Chords

Last Updated on May 12, 2019 by Klaus Crow

So why do you want to learn jazz chords? Well, jazz chords will spice up and enrich your playing. It doesn’t even matter if you want to play jazz or not, the chords are perfectly suited for/and regularly used in pop, blues, country, flamenco, and other styles of music.

It’s a good collection of chord types and flavors to add to your chord vocabulary, and expand your skill set. You will come across these chords one way or another in the songs you always wanted to learn. So, if you don’t have these chords under your belt yet, now is the time.

If you do want to step up your playing and learn jazz, these chords are a great start and a solid foundation. There are an endless amount of chords used in jazz, but you can already come a long way with just these 15 easy and popular beginner jazz chords.

Chord Types

In the chord diagrams below we got five rows of chord types:
Maj7 – min7 – dom7 – min7b5 and diminished 7th.
Every row contains three chord shapes with each chord starting the root note (red notes in the chord diagrams below) on a different string. The root note is usually the lowest sounding note in a chord, and determines the key and name of the chord.

The first chord shape starts with the root on the Low E string. The second chord shape starts with the root on the A-string, and the third chord shape starts with the root on the D-string.

Moveable Chord Shapes

All the chord shapes are a moveable chord shapes that can be played in every key just by moving the chord up or down the fretboard. As I already mentioned, the root note determines the name of the chord. For example: The root note of the Gmaj7 chord is a G note. If you move the entire chord (shape) up a half step (1 fret) on the neck the root note is G#, which means the chord name is G#maj7. This goes for all the chords. If you move the Cmaj7 chord down a half step the root note becomes “B”, which means the chord name is Bmaj7, and so on.

The numbers on the dots indicate the fingering for each chord. 1 = first finger, 2 = second finger, 3 = third finger, 4 = fourth finger (pinky), and the red note indicates the root note. An X means that string is muted usually with the help of one of the fingers you are using to press the notes.

Now let’s take a look at the chords:

Maj7 Chords
A major 7th chord is a 4-note chord (often played with duplicate notes because of the six strings of the guitar). The chord sounds kind of dreamy and jazzy. The major 7th chord (Maj7) consists of the root (1), 3rd, 5th and 7th notes of the major scale 1-3-5-7. So a major the 7th note of the major scale is added to the major chord. For further explanation on chord structure see How to use Chord formulas.

Min7 Chords
The min7 chord is also a 4-note chord and has a melancholy sound to it. The minor 7th chord (m7) consists of the root, minor 3rd, 5th and flatted (b) 7th notes of the major scale (1 b3 5 b7).

Dom7 Chords
The dominant 7th chord is a typical blues chord, but also regularly used in jazz. The dom7 consists of the root, 3rd, 5th and flatted (b) 7th notes of the major scale (1 3 5 b7).

Minor 7b5 Chords
The minor 7b5 chord (m7b5), also called “half diminished” consists of the root, minor 3rd, flatted (b) 5th and flatted (b) 7th notes of the major scale (1 b3 b5 b7)

Diminished 7th
The diminished 7 chord (dim7) has a dissonant sound. It consists of the root, minor 3rd, flatted (b) 5th and double flatted (bb) 7th notes of the major scale (1 b3 b5 bb7). Which makes the double flatted 7th enharmonically the same as a major sixth. (bb7 = 6)

Assignments:

Have a great jazz practice!

Sours: https://www.guitarhabits.com/15-easy-beginner-jazz-guitar-chords/
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20 Basic Jazz Chords for Guitar [UPDATED]

So you’re a guitarist and you want to start getting your jazz chops together. Awesome!

Here’s the great news:

Contrary to what you may have heard, you don’t need to know a million shapes, chords, or scales on your guitar.

In fact, if you know just the basic shapes, you can play them anywhere on the neck and immediately start comping through jazz standards.

Even better news:

Jazz is mainly about learning language by ear. And while that may sound intimidating if you are used to looking up guitar tabs, it’s actually incredibly liberating.

With the right training and guidance you can defy the maze of the instrument that is the guitar, and start playing chord changes like you wouldn’t believe (I’ll talk about that more at the end of this post).

But before we jump off the deep end, let’s get together some basic jazz guitar chord shapes.

As a comping instrument, it is important for you to have some basic voicings in your repertoire.

Most jazz voicings are 7th chord voicings.

This means that each chord is built: Root-3rd-5th-7th, with those notes being altered depending on the chord quality.

Let’s start walking through basic voicings, quality by quality.

Major 7 Jazz Guitar Voicings

Major 7th chords are built: R-3rd-5th-7th.

But the notes don’t have to go in that order, and that’s often not realistic or practical for guitar voicings.

Major 7 Guitar Chords

Notice as well that sometimes I have a 9 added. This means that we are simply adding an “extension” to the chord.

Think of the 9 as the second scale tone of a major scale. This adds more color to chord and jazz guitarists and pianists do this all of the time.

So if you see a “Cmaj7” chord on a lead sheet, know that you can add any colors you’d like that fit a major chord quality.

One last thing to mention for these major 7 voicings and all of the voicings I’m about to show you is that they are “moveable.”

This simply means that as long as you know where the root notes are on your guitar, you can play these chords in any key.

To learn how to play more major 7 voicings on guitar, check out this post.

Minor 7 Jazz Guitar Voicings

Minor 7 chords are built: R-b3-5-b7.

Again, this doesn’t mean the notes have to be played in that order. Here are some of the most common voicings.

Once again, you’ll notice that one of the voicings includes the 9 extension. This is a common voicing on guitar that you can easily sub for a regular minor 7.

You’ll also see an 11 included in one of the voicings. The 11 is an acceptable extension for minor 7 chords, but doesn’t quite work so well for major 7 chords.

To learn how to play more minor 7 voicings on guitar, check out this post.

Dominant 7 Jazz Guitar Voicings

Dominant 7 chords are built: R-3-5-b7.

These are important in jazz, from the blues to V-I relationships.

The voicings that include the 13th are very common jazz guitar voicings for dominant 7 chords. Having these basics in your arsenal will immediately have you engaging in that jazz sound.

To learn how to play more dominant 7 voicings on guitar, check out this post.

Half-Diminished and Diminished 7 Jazz Guitar Voicings

I’m combining the last two of the 7th chord qualities, because there really are only two or 3 common voicings for each.

Half-diminished (or minor 7(b5) chords) are built: R-b3-b5-b7.

Diminished 7 chords are built: R-b3-b5-bb7.

You’ll see half-diminished chords come up in minor ii-V-i chord progressions, and you’ll see diminished 7 chords come up in several different situations, such as passing from one minor 7 chord to another.

To learn more half-diminished voicings on guitar, check out this post.

To learn more diminished 7 voicings on guitar, check out this post.

These are some great basic jazz guitar voicings to get you started and I would encourage you to pick the ones you like the most and play them in all 12 keys.

What to do next:

Okay, great, you’ve got some basic jazz guitar voicings down. So what’s next?

There are many different directions to go depending on what you already know and don’t know. And since I don’t know exactly where you are at in your playing, let me give you some options.

Option #1: Get some basic jazz theory down.

If you need help with scales, building chords, chord progressions, and using all of this to start improvising, check out my eBook and Companion Course “Zero to Improv”. It’s not guitar-specific, but it doesn’t need to be.

>>>Get Zero to Improv<<<

Option #2: Start learning jazz standards.

Now that you are equiped with some chord voicings, the best way to learn how to start playing jazz is to start learning jazz standards, of course! Get my free “Learn Jazz Standards the Smart Way” Guide, and I’ll teach you how to do it the right way.

>>Get my free Learn Jazz Standards The Smart Way Guide<<<

Option #3: Start mastering a jazz blues.

When it comes to getting started learning jazz, there is no better place to start than with the blues. Considering most guitar players are familiar with some blues stuff, even better. My free “Boost Your Jazz Blues” masterclass will teach you how to start mastering a jazz blues to give you an unfair advantage with all the rest of jazz improv.

>>>Get My Free Boost Your Jazz Blues masterclass<<<

Any one of these should help you get started and continue your jazz journey!

Sours: https://www.learnjazzstandards.com/blog/20-basic-jazz-chords-for-guitar/
G Maj: 1-5-6-4 Chord Progression with Passing Chords Tutorial

Jazz guitar chords can be complicated and as a beginner, it’s hard to know where to start. When first learning how to play jazz chords, many of us are intimidated by their sounds and shapes. But, jazz chords don’t have to be difficult to get under your fingers if you begin with the right shapes. The chord chart in this lesson features the 17 chord shapes that are essential when learning how to play jazz guitar.

This lesson is designed to introduce you to the various families of jazz guitar chords, with a focus on important, but easy-to-play shapes.

By studying the basic jazz chords in this lesson, you will not only introduce yourself to the world of jazz guitar chords, but you will learn how to apply them to chord progressions as well, getting you ready to jam with friends or comp along to your favorite backing track in no time.

 

What Are Jazz Chords?

This is a tough question to ask, as many chords associated with jazz are also found in pop, classical, rock, blues, and other musical genres.

Jazz chords are shapes that use at least 4 notes in their construction. These are chords that go beyond the 3-note triad and include the 7th, 9th, 11th, and/or 13th.

If you want to play a major chord in rock, you would normally just play the major triad, G for example.

If you want to play a major chord in jazz, you would play Gmaj7, G6, G6/9, or another major chord that extends beyond the major triads that are used as rock guitar chords.

In order to help you learn the construction of each chord in this lesson, the intervals for each shape have been written on the fretboard, which will help you understand how all of these chords have been constructed.

Here are the interval formulas for the five chord types you will be learning first:

  • Major 7th chords: 1 3 5 7
  • Dominant 7th chords: 1 3 5 b7
  • Minor 7th chords: 1 b3 5 b7
  • Half-Diminished 7th chords: 1 b3 b5 b7
  • Diminished 7th chords: 1 b3 b5 bb7

These formulas are explained in more detail in our chord theory tutorial, but knowing them isn’t a must at this time. You can learn jazz without knowing too much theory, although music theory can be a huge time-saver for learning jazz guitar.

Start by learning the basic chords and chord progressions below, and then keep working on chord theory, as it will be covered in other guitar lessons.

How to Read Chord Diagrams?

The red circle represents the root note (aka 1 or bass note) of the chord. The numbers in the black circles are the other chord tones.

On the chord charts below, all bass notes are C.

By moving these chord shapes up or down the guitar neck, you get other chords of the same type.

For example: move the chord shape of Cmaj7 two frets higher and it becomes a Dmaj7.

Movable guitar chords

The number underneath the chord diagram is the fret number.

In the example above, the starting fret is the 7th fret. This means you put your finger on the 8th fret on the lowest string, a finger on the 9th fret of the D-string, a finger on the 9th fret of the G-string, and finally a finger on the 8th fret of the B-string.

The numbers at the right side of each chord diagram indicate which fingers to use to fret the chord with your left hand.

Guitar chord fingerings
The x symbols at the left side of the chord indicate that those strings are not to be played. This means most of the chords in these chord charts cannot be strummed but must be played fingerstyle, with the thumb and first three fingers of your right hand.

Notice how each chord type only changes one note compared to the next chord type. This can help you memorize the chords and relate them to one another.

For example: Cmaj7 (first shape) and C7 (second shape) only have one different note (the flat 7). The same goes for C7 and Cm7 (the minor 3rd).

Hear how changing these notes alters the chord quality.

Guitar chord types

Jazz Guitar Chord Charts

The following chord charts show you the easy jazz chords laid out on the fretboard for you to play through and use as a reference guide for further study.

These must-know chord voicings are essential for any beginning jazz guitarist and the minimum requirement to learn jazz standards. If you memorize every chord shape and practice them well, you will be able to play the chord changes of most jazz standards.

Learning jazz chords is best done by playing songs and practicing the chord progression exercises that are below the jazz chord chart. When you have these exercises under your fingers, start playing other chord progressions.

 

Jazz Chords with the Root Note on the 6th String

Jazz guitar chords with root on the 6th string

 

Jazz Chords with the Root Note on the 5th String

Jazz guitar chords with root on the 5th string

 

Jazz Chords with the Root Note on the 4th String

Jazz guitar chords with root on the 4th string

Click here to download these chord charts as an infographic.

How To Practice Jazz Guitar Chords?

The most fun and effective way to practice jazz guitar chords is playing chord progressions and jazz standards.

Below are four exercises that will get these beginner guitar chords under your fingers.

 

Jazz Guitar Chords Exercise 1 – Kenny Burrell

This vamp in the style of Kenny Burrell is a good exercise to practice minor and major 7 chords.

In this exercise, you will learn three common chords, beginning with F9 (bar 17):

F9 chord

The next two are E7#9 and E7b9, which are often played in succession (bar 19 and 20):

E7 altered chords

Minor Blues Jazz Guitar Vamp in the Style of Kenny Burrell

Kenny Burrell Minor Blues Chords Vamp

 

 

Jazz Guitar Chords Exercise 2 – Diminished Chords

This chord progression exercise introduces a new, but common diminished chord shape (here with G# as the root):

Jazz Guitar Chord Progression Exercise

Jazz Guitar Chord Exercise 2

 

 

Jazz Guitar Chords Exercise 3

in this exercise, you will be playing a series of 2 5 1 progressions using a simple rhythm so you can concentrate on the chords.

Backing Track

Listen & Play Along

Beginner chords example 1

 

 

Jazz Guitar Chord Exercise 4 – Walking Bass

This exercise combines the beginner guitar chords from above with a walking bass line.

Rhythm Track

Listen & Play Along

Beginner chords example 2

 

 

Jazz Guitar Chord Exercise 5

This chord exercise over a common chord progression includes diminished chords.

Backing Track

Listen & Play Along

Beginner chords example 3

 

More Easy Jazz Guitar Chords

When you’re ready with the 17 chords from the chord charts above, it’s time to learn some more chord shapes and chord types.

 

Major 7th Chords

Here is a chord chart with 9 major chord voicings, which include maj7, 6, and 6/9 chords.

These major jazz chords are often used at the Imaj7 chord in a major key ii-V-I progression.

Easy Jazz Guitar Chords - Major Chord Chart

 

Dominant 7th Chords

You will now move on to working on dominant jazz chords, which will focus on 7, 9, and 13th chord shapes.

Some of these chord shapes you will already know as they are common blues guitar chords.

These chords are used in jazz blues chord progressions, as well as the V7 chord in a major key ii-V or ii-V-I progression.

Easy Jazz Guitar Chords - Dominant Chord Chart

 

Minor 7th Chords

In this section, you will work on minor jazz guitar chords, which include m7, m6, m9, and m11 chord shapes.

Minor jazz chords are often used as the iim7 chord in a major ii-V or ii-V-I progression, as well as the Im7 chord in a minor ii-V-I progression.

Easy Jazz Guitar Chords - Minor Chord Chart

 

Minor 7b5 Chords (aka Half-Diminished Chords)

The next group of chords focuses on minor 7b5 chords, also called half-diminished chords and written m7b5.

Because there is only one easy shape per string set for these chords, you will only need to learn 3 m7b5 voicings.

Half diminished chords are used as the iim7b5 chord in a minor key ii-V progression.

Easy Jazz Guitar Chords - Half Diminished Chord Chart

 

Diminished 7th Chords

Diminished chords are often used as passing chords, such as in the chord progression Imaj7-#Idim7-iim7.

They can also be used in place of a 7b9 chord, such as playing C#dim7 instead of A7b9.

Easy Jazz Guitar Chords - Diminished Chord Chart

 

Altered Chords

The last set of chords that you’ll explore are altered chords, which you will often see written as 7alt on lead sheets. These chords feature the b9, #9, b5 or b13(#5), or any combination of those notes.

Since we are looking at easy jazz chords in this lesson, you will only use one altered note per chord. Over time you might find yourself drawn to use two altered notes when playing these types of chords, such as 7(b9,b5) for example.

These chords are often found as the V7 chord in a minor key ii-V or ii-V-I chord progression, which you will see in the chord progression examples below.

Easy Jazz Guitar Chords - Altered Dominant Chord Chart

Major 2-5-1 Comping Patterns

Now that you have checked out these easy jazz chords on their own, it’s time to bring them together and apply them to common jazz progressions.

To begin, here are three ii-V-I-VI chord progressions that use the shapes from this lesson in their makeup. After you have learned these initial examples, make sure to take them to other keys in order to practice them around the entire fretboard.

You can substitute any other chord from the same family into these progressions in order to expand upon them in your studies. For example, if the chord is Cmaj7, you could play a C6 or C6/9 chord in its place as they are all from the same family of chords.

To start off, here is a ii-V-I-VI in C major that begins with the iim7 chord on the 6th string, and moves around the changes from that starting point.

Listen & Play Along

easy jazz chords example 1

Next, you will work out the same progression, but this time the iim7 chord is on the 5th string and you will move to the other chords from that initial chord.

Listen & Play Along

easy jazz chords example 2

Lastly, here is a progression that moves around the fretboard a bit, which is something you might want to do when comping behind a soloist, beginning with the iim7 chord on the 4th string.

Listen & Play Along

easy jazz chords example 3

Minor 2-5-1 Comping Patterns

The final exercise in this lesson will feature three minor key chord progressions that use a number of the chords featured in the lesson above.

As was the case with the major key examples, feel free to expand upon these chord progressions by taking them to other keys, as well as substitute other chord shapes from this lesson into these progressions.

To begin, here is a minor ii-V-I-bIII progression that begins with the iim7b5 chord on the 6th string and works around the chords from that starting point.

Listen & Play Along

easy jazz chords example 4

Next, you will begin with the iim7b5 chord on the 5th string and work your way around the progression from there.

Listen & Play Along

easy jazz chords example 5

Finally, you will begin with the root note of the iim7b5 chord on the 4th string, with the subsequent changes being closely related to that initial shape.

Listen & Play Along

easy jazz chords example 6

After you have explored these shapes, and if you got stuck or have any observations on this lesson, share your thoughts in the comments section below.

If you want to learn how to play jazz guitar chords step-by-step, check out our best-selling eBook, The Easy Guide to Jazz Guitar Chords.

The Easy Guide to Jazz Guitar Chords

 

 
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Sours: https://www.jazzguitar.be/blog/17-essential-jazz-guitar-chords-beginners/

Chords g jazz

You’re able to play barre chords, you might’ve tried experimenting with your finger positioning, moving frets or taking fingers off. If you have, you’ll have found that the sound of the chord changes drastically with even small changes, unlocking a whole new dimension to your playing and to the chords that you choose to use in songwriting.

However, there are other chords all over the neck that aren’t necessarily barre chords. These chords can come in odd shapes, and can sometimes even sound a little weird. These are the jazz chords – chords that jazz musicians usually use to write music, create more interesting chord progressions and songs, and that can be used to make up that stereotypical jazz harmony sound.

In this guide, we’re going to explain what jazz chords are, explore where you might have heard them in famous songs already, take a look at some common major and minor versions of them, and give you a chart of common jazz chord shapes that you can move up and down the neck.

Contents

What are Jazz Chords?

Jazz chords are chord triads with a little extra on the side. Usually, they incorporate a seventh note into the chord to add some tension to an otherwise normal chord. The most interesting thing about these chords is that they’re almost entirely as complex or as simple as you want them to be. If you’re very comfortable with music theory and jazz theory you might find that you can improvise and do all kinds of things with a basic chord; removing the fifth note is quite common – you could even remove the root of the chord if you’re playing with a group and somebody else is holding that note down (for instance, a bassist). However, removing notes is only half of the equation.

Particularly on a guitar, when you remove a note you free up a finger – which you can then use to add an additional note to the chord. This is definitely the area where some knowledge of musical theory is useful, especially knowledge about how scales work. You could add in a ninth note, or a thirteenth – I personally like to use 11th chords. There are no real limits here, and as far as your harmony goes it really becomes up to you; are you leading the melody, or providing the rhythm? Are you in the spotlight, or do you need to blend in with the band and make sure you don’t pick chords and notes that will clash with other members and make the music sound sour?

For this post though, we’re going to keep things a little more simple – the chords won’t sound any less great, but we’ll save the music theory lessons for another time. Let’s move on to where you would have heard some jazz chords before in popular music – and a few of these might surprise you.

Jazz Chords in Popular Songs

You might not think it – but you can find jazz chords in one of the biggest songs from one of the biggest grunge bands of all time. If you’re a fan of grunge, you’ll know how unique Stone Temple Pilots sound. From their debut, Core, an album widely accused at the time of ripping off Pearl Jam, they grew and matured hugely over the next two albums until they were playing a strange kind of bossa-nova influenced alternative rock on Tiny Music… Songs From The Vatican Gift Shop. Dean DeLeo, the guitarist for Stone Temple Pilots, takes a lot of influence from jazz and jazz musicians like Wes Montgomery – and this is absolutely the most evident on one of my favourite songs of all time, Interstate Love Song. The jangly intro gives way to an undeniably jazzy walkdown through a number of chords over the verses, including three 7th chords and an 11th chord at the end of each verse.

The Beatles were also fans of jazz chords – particularly 7th chords. 7th chords have a very late 60’s kind of sound to them (to me at least!) and I’m sure this is in no small part thanks to the Beatles’ uses of them in massive chart-topping hits like Let It Be (which features 7th and 6th chords), And Your Bird Can Sing (which has a few 7th chords), and Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (which is almost entirely built from 7th chords). This seemed to spread over into the individual members of The Beatles themselves, with George Harrison incorporating 7th chords into his 1970 album All Things Must Pass, and even John Lennon using them in arguably his most famous solo work, Imagine.

Of course, no mention of jazz chords would be complete without, in my opinion, the most famous jazz chord of all time – the Hendrix chord. Used in Purple Haze, the Hendrix chord is an E chord with a 7th and a sharpened 9th note. It’s impossible to play this chord and not think of Hendrix – here’s a diagram of how to play it:

hendrix chord

Here, the low E, high E and the E note (fret 7 on the A string) are providing the root of the chord. The G# note on the D string (fret 6) is the third of the chord, while the D note on the G string (7th fret) is where things start to get interesting. This is the minor seventh of E, turning this chord into a dominant seventh chord. However, the addition of the higher G note (8th fret on the B string) turns this chord into a dominant seventh sharpened ninth chord, written like this: E7#9. Jazz chord names can sometimes look more than a little daunting when you see them written out, with a combination of letters, symbols and numbers. It’s nothing to worry about though, you can easily break them down just by looking at the names.

With those out of the way – let’s move on to look at some common major chords used in jazz.

Major Jazz Chords

As with basic chords, jazz chords have both major and minor-sounding variations.

Major Seventh Chords

Probably the most common of the jazz chords — the way to make a major seventh chord is to simply add a seventh to an existing major chord. This typically is done with the pinky finger – so I hope you’ve been doing your stretches! You can add to your open chords like this:

chord chart 7th chords open

Or create a moveable barre chord with these shapes:

chord chart 7th chords

In the above examples, I’ve highlighted the “root” note of the chord. The root indicates what chord you’ll be playing (in this case, for both chord shapes we’re putting the root on the 3rd fret – meaning we’re playing a C on the fifth string, or a G on the sixth string). To change the chord, all you have to do is move the shape up or down the neck, so that the root matches the note that you want. For example, if you wanted to play a D7, with the root on the fifth string, you’d simply move the first chord shape up so that you’re barring the fifth fret.

There are also some 7th chords that have more interesting shapes – these are a little more complex, so if you look into playing these, practice shifting your fingers in and out of these shapes slowly at first! I won’t be including those here, as this is a beginners introduction to jazz chords and the above barre shapes will give you a good foundation to understand how they work.

Major Sixth Chords

These are a little more tricky than the 7th chords, requiring slightly more complex finger positioning. They’re also more tricky to use in songs, as while they are major chords, they can carry a bit of a minor sound. They’re typically used for jazz chord progressions or melodies that switch between major and minor – a really interesting thing to master! Here’s how you can make moveable major 6th shapes to play up and down the neck:

chord chart 6th chords

The C6 isn’t so tricky to play as it’s essentially just the open C7 (without playing any open strings), and then moving your pinky back one fret to hit the sixth. However, the G6 is a more difficult shape – make sure you practice slowly at first, because you really need to mute the fifth string and make sure it doesn’t ring out. Don’t worry if it sounds bad at first, just keep trying!

With the major shapes out of the way, let’s move on to where things get really jazzy – the minor shapes.

Minor Jazz Chords

Minor jazz chords are interesting, because realistically as a solo guitar player you might struggle to play a minor 11th or minor 13th and have it sound good. This is because the chords you can make on a guitar are a little more limited than a piano; on a piano, you have ten fingers to work with – that’s ten notes. With a guitar, you’ve got four fingers — maybe even a thumb over the top if you’re like Jimi Hendrix!

When jazz musicians play minor 11th and minor 13th chords, they typically remove some extra notes from the chord, for instance the root or the fifth, and rely on other musicians to fill that space for them, creating a chord as a band rather than as one instrument. This takes skill, teamwork and experience – so don’t be discouraged if you’re looking at the chords for a song, and you play a chord correctly but it sounds a little weird. It took me ages to figure that out!

There are still minor jazz chords that you can play, though – here’s a couple of examples:

Minor Ninth Chords

chord chart minor 9th chords
Again, I’ve highlighted the roots in red. There are multiple ways to play minor ninth chords, but these shapes are moveable around the fretboard and in my experience are the easiest to play – it doesn’t mean they’re simple though, so get some warmups and stretching in first!

Minor Seventh Chords

chord chart minor 7th chords
Back to a little bit of simplicity with these chords – an easy way to spice up any minor chord progression or sad song. These are the minor versions of the major seventh chords we learnt earlier, and as always these shapes are moveable up and down the neck.

jazz chords to master

Categories How to Play GuitarSours: https://beginnerguitarhq.com/jazz-chords/
G Maj: 1-5-6-4 Chord Progression with Passing Chords Tutorial

G Jazz Minor Inverse: The big list of chords and scale notes

Scale notes:G, G#, A#, C, D, E, F

MIDI file:scale_g_jazz_minor_inverse.mid(includes scale notes and chords)


Other root notes:[C], [C#], [D], [D#], [E], [F], [F#], [G], [G#], [A], [A#], [B]

Other scales:List of available scales

Overview

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Infographic: The most important chords
All important chords of G Jazz Minor Inverse

The most important triads
The following chords are the most important triads of this scale:

Gmin (i): G-3, A#3, D-4
Gmin (i)
G#aug (II+): G#3, C-4, E-4
G#aug (II+)
A#maj (III): A#3, D-4, F-4
A#maj (III)
Cmaj (IV): C-4, E-4, G-4
Cmaj (IV)
Ddim (v°): D-4, F-4, G#4
Ddim (v°)
Edim (vi°): E-4, G-4, A#4
Edim (vi°)
Fmin (vii): F-4, G#4, C-5
Fmin (vii)

The most important four note chords
The following chords are the most important four note chords of this scale:

Gmin7 (i7): G-3, A#3, D-4, F-4
Gmin7 (i7)
G#maj7#5 (II7): G#3, C-4, E-4, G-4
G#maj7#5 (II7)
A#dom7 (III7): A#3, D-4, F-4, G#4
A#dom7 (III7)
Cdom7 (IV7): C-4, E-4, G-4, A#4
Cdom7 (IV7)
Dmin7b5 (vø7): D-4, F-4, G#4, C-5
Dmin7b5 (vø7)
Emin7b5 (viø7): E-4, G-4, A#4, D-5
Emin7b5 (viø7)
Fm maj7 (vii7): F-4, G#4, C-5, E-5
Fm maj7 (vii7)

Common chords with bass note G
Gmin (i): G-3, A#3, D-4
Gmin (i)
Edim/G: G-3, A#3, E-4
Edim/G
Gsus4: G-3, C-4, D-4
Gsus4
Cmaj/G: G-3, C-4, E-4
Cmaj/G
G5: G-3, D-4, G-4
G5
G#maj7#5/G: G-3, G#3, C-4, E-4
G#maj7#5/G
Cdom7/G: G-3, A#3, C-4, E-4
Cdom7/G
Gmin6: G-3, A#3, D-4, E-4
Gmin6
Gmin7 (i7): G-3, A#3, D-4, F-4
Gmin7 (i7)
G7sus4: G-3, C-4, D-4, F-4
G7sus4

Common chords with bass note G#
G#aug (II+): G#3, C-4, E-4
G#aug (II+)
Fmin/G#: G#3, C-4, F-4
Fmin/G#
Ddim/G#: G#3, D-4, F-4
Ddim/G#
A#dom7/G#: G#3, A#3, D-4, F-4
A#dom7/G#
Dmin7b5/G#: G#3, C-4, D-4, F-4
Dmin7b5/G#
Fm maj7/G#: G#3, C-4, E-4, F-4
Fm maj7/G#
G#maj7#5 (II7): G#3, C-4, E-4, G-4
G#maj7#5 (II7)

Common chords with bass note A#
A#sus2: A#3, C-4, F-4
A#sus2
A#maj (III): A#3, D-4, F-4
A#maj (III)
Gmin/A#: A#3, D-4, G-4
Gmin/A#
Edim/A#: A#3, E-4, G-4
Edim/A#
A#5: A#3, F-4, A#4
A#5
Cdom7/A#: A#3, C-4, E-4, G-4
Cdom7/A#
A#7sus2: A#3, C-4, F-4, G#4
A#7sus2
Emin7b5/A#: A#3, D-4, E-4, G-4
Emin7b5/A#
A#6: A#3, D-4, F-4, G-4
A#6
A#dom7 (III7): A#3, D-4, F-4, G#4
A#dom7 (III7)
A#add9: A#3, D-4, F-4, C-5
A#add9

Common chords with bass note C
Csus2: C-4, D-4, G-4
Csus2
Cmaj (IV): C-4, E-4, G-4
Cmaj (IV)
Caug: C-4, E-4, G#4
Caug
Csus4: C-4, F-4, G-4
Csus4
Fmin/C: C-4, F-4, G#4
Fmin/C
C5: C-4, G-4, C-5
C5
Dmin7b5/C: C-4, D-4, F-4, G#4
Dmin7b5/C
C7sus2: C-4, D-4, G-4, A#4
C7sus2
Fm maj7/C: C-4, E-4, F-4, G#4
Fm maj7/C
G#maj7#5/C: C-4, E-4, G-4, G#4
G#maj7#5/C
Cdom7 (IV7): C-4, E-4, G-4, A#4
Cdom7 (IV7)
Cadd9: C-4, E-4, G-4, D-5
Cadd9
C7sus4: C-4, F-4, G-4, A#4
C7sus4

Common chords with bass note D
Ddim (v°): D-4, F-4, G#4
Ddim (v°)
A#maj/D: D-4, F-4, A#4
A#maj/D
Gmin/D: D-4, G-4, A#4
Gmin/D
Emin7b5/D: D-4, E-4, G-4, A#4
Emin7b5/D
Gmin7/D: D-4, F-4, G-4, A#4
Gmin7/D
A#dom7/D: D-4, F-4, G#4, A#4
A#dom7/D
Dmin7b5 (vø7): D-4, F-4, G#4, C-5
Dmin7b5 (vø7)

Common chords with bass note E
Edim (vi°): E-4, G-4, A#4
Edim (vi°)
Cmaj/E: E-4, G-4, C-5
Cmaj/E
Eaug: E-4, G#4, C-5
Eaug
Fm maj7/E: E-4, F-4, G#4, C-5
Fm maj7/E
G#maj7#5/E: E-4, G-4, G#4, C-5
G#maj7#5/E
Cdom7/E: E-4, G-4, A#4, C-5
Cdom7/E
Emin7b5 (viø7): E-4, G-4, A#4, D-5
Emin7b5 (viø7)

Common chords with bass note F
Fsus2: F-4, G-4, C-5
Fsus2
Fmin (vii): F-4, G#4, C-5
Fmin (vii)
Ddim/F: F-4, G#4, D-5
Ddim/F
Fsus4: F-4, A#4, C-5
Fsus4
A#maj/F: F-4, A#4, D-5
A#maj/F
F5: F-4, C-5, F-5
F5
Gmin7/F: F-4, G-4, A#4, D-5
Gmin7/F
A#dom7/F: F-4, G#4, A#4, D-5
A#dom7/F
Fmin6: F-4, G#4, C-5, D-5
Fmin6
Fm maj7 (vii7): F-4, G#4, C-5, E-5
Fm maj7 (vii7)
Sours: https://feelyoursound.com/scale-chords/g-jazz-minor-inverse/

Now discussing:

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