Royal staffordshire dinnerware

Royal staffordshire dinnerware DEFAULT

Staffordshire Porcelain

Get to know your antique porcelain collectibles by learning to recognise Staffordshire porcelain.

Novelty Staffordshire Porcelain Tea Pot

Most people have probably heard of Staffordshire Porcelain, and most vintage and antique porcelain collectors are probably familiar with the name.

But, just what does Staffordshire mean when you&#;re talking about pottery & porcelain?

Is it a company name? Is it a style, or type of porcelain? Is it just a region that porcelain comes from? Or could the answer be all of the above?

This is information every keen porcelain collector should know.

Staffordshire porcelain is essentially all the above.

There is a noted porcelain company named Crown Staffordshire, and Staffordshire is a region that was, (and still is), home to many English porcelain makers.

It is also a type of porcelain which was known as salt-glazed, or creamware porcelain, but these aren&#;t the only types produced there.

And it is also associated with a style of porcelain design &#; Blue Ware was a porcelain design that originated in Staffordshire.

So yes, the answer is that Staffordshire porcelain is all the above, and most collectors of Staffordshire antique porcelain know that this is a very broad category, so they almost always focus their collections on one aspect of Staffordshire porcelain.

Ridgways Flow Blue Meat Platter

The Origins of Porcelain in Staffordshire.

As a region, Staffordshire became the hub for many English porcelain makers and manufactories because of its close proximity to the source of Devonshire clay, a prime ingredient in the formula for most types of English porcelain.

Its location was also central to major water and land transports of the time, which is another important consideration when deciding where to establish a manufacturing facility.

And then there is also the small detail that it just happened to be the region where the first potteries started in the early &#;s, and grew into an industry from that first seed or two.

English porcelain was a mix of several types of porcelain, and with the diversity of potteries and porcelain makers in Staffordshire it is no wonder that recognized Staffordshire pieces can be any one of many varieties.

In August , a varied collection of good Staffordshire antique porcelain exceeded all expectations when it was sold at a Devon auction house.

The Staffordshire Pottery was predicted to sell for £70, but high demand pushed the hammer price to £,

The majority of the collection dated to the midth century and comprised Staffordshire Figures which are primarily of animals and famous people. Some pieces, however, were as early as the &#;s and other pieces dated to the early &#;s.

Early English porcelain was a basic tin-glazed formulation called Delftware.

As porcelain makers began using the Devonshire white clay their porcelain formulations became known as soft-paste or salt-glazed porcelain. This process produced a sturdy utilitarian type of porcelain and was the predominate output for many years.

As porcelain makers worked to improve their formulas, a new combination using bone ash was discovered. This led to the production of a porcelain called bone-china, which was harder and more elegant looking, and more like the revered Chinese porcelain that set the standards for fine porcelain.

Even the name, bone-china, references it&#;s similarity to Chinese porcelain, and bone-china remains the type of porcelain most associated with Staffordshire today.

Style Developed in Staffordshire

With so many porcelain makers in the Staffordshire region, it&#;s not hard to understand why there were so many design styles associated with the Staffordshire name.

Probably the most recognized Staffordshire porcelain would be Blue Ware or Flow Blue Porcelain as pictured above, (although Flow Blue is more a process than a type of porcelain).

Staffordshire Figural Watch Holder

The English porcelain industry was reaching its peak in Staffordshire as porcelain makers were discovering the benefits of a cobalt coloring they were using.

Cobalt blue worked so well on the porous surface of unfinished porcelain pieces during the design transfer process, that the flow of the color actually helped hide some of the imperfections that naturally occur in early porcelain production.

Porcelain makers loved Flow Blue.

This was also about the same time the American market was opening, and many of the Staffordshire manufactories were producing porcelain directed at this new American market.

Due to their enthusiasm for the new cobalt blue coloring, even though the scenes and designs were different, the majority of porcelain pieces produced for this market used cobalt blues as the main colors, hence the name Blue Ware.

Major Staffordshire Porcelain Maufacturers.

The list of porcelain potteries from the Staffordshire region includes many well recognized names in the world of vintage porcelain collectibles.

The one company that retains the Staffordshire name is Crown Staffordshire Porcelain, which started as the Thomas Greene China Co. in

Using bone-china porcelain, in they began producing a fine line of Staffordshire dinnerware under the new name of Crown Staffordshire China.

Staffordshire Salt Glaze Teapot

Some of the other famous Staffordshire names include:

  • Spode &#; Early production included creamware, pearlware and blue-printed earthenware.
    Spode also became famous for its bone-china Staffordshire Dinnerware
  • Royal Doulton who started as Doulton and Watts and received their commission to use the name Royal Doulton in
  • Wedgwood – Josiah Wedgwood started the firm and first became known for his line of Queens Ware, a lead-glazed earthenware and the very successful Jasper Ware
  • Wm. Adams & Co. – William Adams was a potter in Staffordshire as early as , and is best known for his colorful Titian Ware line, although he also produced types named Imperial Stone Ware and Calyx Ware
  • Royal Worcester – possibly the finest producer of finely crafted blue transferware Staffordshire China. One of the most successful potteries ever to originate in Staffordshire.
  • Ridgway &#; who began production in The Ridgway brothers produced a hard earthenware line of table wares
Most of these Staffordshire potters contributed major accomplishments to the development of English porcelain

Either through the invention of new processes and formulas or through their hallmarks of craftsmanship and design.

It was their efforts to refine their processes or perfect their craft that place them among the most desired porcelain collectibles around today.


Staffordshire Pottery Marks

A common potters mark or symbol can be found on large quantities of Staffordshire pottery & porcelain.

The Staffordshire knot mark, as it is known, consists of a three loop knot constructed from a length of rope. Often with a set of initials within the knot loops and sometimes a crown above the knot.

The knot has been used by Staffordshire potters for over a hundred years and can still be found on a wide variety of Staffordshire pottery.

&#;Many nineteenth-century printed marks are based on stock designs &#; variations of the royal arms, a garter-shaped mark or the Staffordshire knot (both the garter and knot with and without a crown). The knot can occur from about It was much used in the &#;s and &#;s and continues, in some instances, to the present day. These marks might be found with the initials or names of the relevant manufacturers.&#; &#; from Godden &#;Ceramic Art of Great Britain &#;

The Origin of the Staffordshire Knot

There are various stories of how the Staffordshire knot came to be; One states that a local Sheriff devised the knot to cut costs by allowing three criminals to be hanged with a single rope. Hard to imagine but England has lived through some barbaric times.

However, the earliest verified appearance of the Staffordshire Knot is on a seal in the British Museum. The seal was the property of Joan, Lady of Wake, who died in

The Lady of Wake&#;s possessions passed to her nephew Humphrey, Earl of Stafford, who adopted the Knot of Rope as his badge prior to taking the post of Duke of Buckingham in

The Duke of Buckingham and his descendants then used the Staffordshire Knot as a personal cognizance. However it wasn&#;t part of their armorial bearings, but rather a badge they gave to their servants and retainers as a livery and form of recognition.

The townsmen of Stafford who were leigemen of the Stafford family, also used the knot.

As the English feudal system fell away and civil liberties grew, the knot was gradually adopted by the Citizens, Freemen and Burgesses of Stafford and was eventually included in the Staffordshire Borough Coat of Arms.


So, as you can see, the name Staffordshire can represent many areas in antique porcelain collecting.

But whether you pick a Staffordshire piece because you think it is pretty.

Or your collection focuses on a particular pottery or porcelain manufacturer.

Or you collect a certain style of porcelain or focus on vases, figurines, plates, plaques or another particular form.

Staffordshire porcelain will always provide plenty of choice pieces for you to choose from.

Tip! The choices provided by Staffordshire antique porcelain can be as varied as the interests of any individual porcelain collector. Be sure to focus your attention on good quality and rarity within a specific section of Staffordshire porcelain or you could find yourself with a real mixture.
Sours: https://antique-marks.com/staffordshire-porcelain.html

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DINNERWARE STILL A TOUGH SELL IN THE COLLECTIBLES MARKET

Q -- I have a complete set of Tonquin pattern dinnerware marked "Royal Staffordshire." I have had these dishes for 40 years and believe they might be worth selling. I understand that Clarice Cliff is an artist in England and that this is the only set of dishes she ever designed. I would appreciate any information you can give to me. -- PO, Chesterfield, MO

A -- Howard and Pat Watson's "The Colorful World of Clarice Cliff" (Kevin Francis Publishing, 1992; 107 pp., $24.95) lists 121 patterns designed by Clarice Cliff. Tonquin is not on that list. Why not?

Geoffrey A. Godden's "Encyclopedia of British Pottery and Porcelain Marks" (reprinted by Schiffer Publishing, 1964; 765 pp., out-of-print) notes that Arthur J. Wilkinson Ltd, located in Burslem, Staffordshire, England, made Royal Staffordshire Pottery. Wilkinson manufactured several Clarice Cliff pattern lines, e.g., Bizarre, under its trademarks.

Since your question concerned dinnerware, I called Replacements Ltd. (PO Box 26029, Greensboro, NC 27420) and talked with Nathan Adkins, a curator in the dinnerware section. Replacements maintains an extensive file on the Tonquin pattern, which does have a Clarice Cliff backstamp. The pattern is found with blue, black (very scarce), brown, green, multi-color, plum and red/pink transfers.

I talked next with Michael Lindsey (Lagunna, 609 Second Ave., Seattle, WA 98104). Although dealing primarily in American dinnerware patterns, Michael was familiar with Tonquin. When I told him that I could not find it listed in the Clarice Cliff reference books in my library, he offered to check the reference books in his collection. He could not find any reference to it either. Since the books in our libraries were published in England, we speculated that perhaps the pattern was sold only in the American market.

I finally solved the mystery by talking with Darryl Rehr (2591 Military Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90064), who deals in Clarice Cliff art pottery, e.g., Bizarre-Ware, Fantasque and Cruise Ware, plus, oddly enough, typewriters. Darryl informed me that Tonquin was a transfer pattern featuring a Victorian scene with an oriental motif.

Serious Clarice Cliff collectors only want her art pottery designer pieces. They care little about Cliff's transfer pattern dinnerware. They consider it junk. Darryl also indicated there was a second transfer pattern featuring Victorian rural scenes.

Dennis Lockard (2 Hats Antiques, PO Box 1192, Clarksville, VA 23972), a major dealer in 20th-century English dinnerware, was my final contact. He informed me that "Schroeder's Antique Price Guide, Fourteenth Edition" (Collector Books, 1996; 602 pp., $14.95) has the following in its introduction to the Clarice Cliff category: "Note: Non-hand-painted work (transfer printed) was produced after World War II and into the 1950s. Some of the most common names are 'Tonquin' and 'Charlotte.' These items, while attractive and enjoyable to own, have no value in the collector market."

Lockard strongly disagrees. Tonquin is one of the most popular dinnerware patterns that he sells. Blue and red/pink are the two most popular colors, with blue holding a slight lead at the moment. Collectors collect Tonquin pattern dinnerware because of its large form vocabulary. The pattern has four varieties of candle holders, several table lamps, a toast holder and urn bud vase. Lockard recently found a Tonquin asparagus plate, a form rarely found in a dinnerware pattern.

Since you did not mention how large your service was, how many pieces it contained, nor its color, I am assuming it is a service for eight, is one of the common colors, and has a minimum number of serving pieces.

Your dinnerware has two values. A collector of Clarice Cliff art pottery would pay very little, a few hundred dollars, at best, for the full set.

I asked Nathan Adkins from Replacements Ltd. to quote a red/pink dinner plate ($32) and cup and saucer ($31). Lockard prices dinner plates between $18 and $22. He emphatically noted that some forms sell for $100 or more, e.g., the asparagus holder at $100 and table lamp between $150 and $200.

I recommend approaching Replacements Ltd. and asking them to quote what they would pay to buy your set. When contacting them, provide an exact piece count, color and a tracing of the backstamp. Expect a quote of $0.30 to $0.40 of the retail dollar. Also consider contacting Lockard for a second offer.

If you try to sell your set privately or at auction, you probably will realize less. Dinnerware services continue to remain a tough sell and a costly expenditure for those who need to buy individual replacement pieces.

Q -- I have a figural cookie jar of a hobo smoking a cigar that was made by Treasure Chest. Is it possible that it depicts the Brooklyn Bum? What is its value? -- SG, Allentown, PA

A -- The problem researching cookie jars is not the lack of information, but the wealth of it. I found your jar listed in five different cookie jar price guides, i.e., assuming the maker in question is Treasure Craft, not Treasure Chest. Check the markings inside your lid again.

Mike Schneider's "The Complete Cookie Jar Book" (Schiffer Publishing, 1991; 312 pp., $59.95) provides the following historical information on Treasure Craft: "Treasure Craft was founded in Gardena, Calif., in 1945 by Alfred A. Levin, and is one of the few American potteries that still produced cookie jars on a fairly large scale ... When Twin Winton Ceramics was sold in 1977, Treasure Craft purchased its molds ... Most Treasure Craft jars are marked inside the lid ... Paper labels ... have been used, too." The Pfaltzgraff Co., York, Pa., bought the company in 1988.

Your Hobo is not the Brooklyn Bum. Ermagene Westfall's "Cookie Jars: Book II" (Collector Books, 1993; 256 pp., $19.95) identifies him as a "Hobo Clown." Schneider values the jar at $35 and Westfall lists it between $35 and $40. Mark and Ellen Supnick's "The Wonderful World of Cookie Jars: A Pictorial Reference and Price Guide" (L-W Book Sales, 1995; 432 pp., $34.95) prices your jar between $95 and $110. Paradise Publications' "1995 Cookie Jar Express Price Guide To Cookie Jars" (PO Box 221, Mayview, OH 64017, 1994; unnumbered pages, soft cover) splits the difference by listing the Treasure Craft Hobo cookie jar between $50 and $65.

Write to Harry Rinker in care of Rinker Collectibles, 5093 Vera Cruz Road, Emmaus, PA 18049.

Sours: https://www.mcall.com/news/mc-xpm-1996-09-08-3102011-story.html
Royal Albert Teapot and mug collection, Miranda Kerr, 100 years of royal Albert and more!

Royal staffordshire plates

Dictionary

Frequently Asked Questions

What kind of plate is from Royal Stafford?

English Bone China Cake Plate - Heavy Gilt, By Royal Stafford. City scenes Royal Stafford England. Burslem Heart of the Potteries. Paris and London dinner plates. Replacements. PLATE, BROWN/WHITE, Porcelain, Royal Stafford, Burslem, England, Asiatic Pheasant, 8 1/2" Round, Vintage.

How many pieces of Royal Stafford dinnerware?

Dining is easy with the Piece Set, offering complete service for four. This set includes four Dinner Plates, four Side Plates, four Cereal Bowls and four Mugs. i loved the astern. Richard. Staten Island, NY.

What is the shape of a Royal Norfolk dinner plate?

The harmonious shape of premium bone porcelain. This royal collection service for 4 (dinner plate, salad plate, rim soup, and mug x 4) is a round shape. Composed of premium bone porcelain, it offers durability, dishwasher, and microwave-safe convenience.

When did Crown Staffordshire porcelain get its name?

The one company that retains the Staffordshire name is Crown Staffordshire Porcelain, which started as the Thomas Greene China Co. in Using bone-china porcelain, in they began producing a fine line of Staffordshire dinnerware under the new name of Crown Staffordshire China.

Sours: https://useenglishwords.com/results/royal-staffordshire-plates/

Staffordshire dinnerware royal

Clarice Cliff Transferware

Here&#;s everything you need to know about CLARICE CLIFF TRANSFERWARE.

I found this set of china at a local antique store about a month after I purchased the cottage. Thankfully, I flipped one of the plates over to look at the hallmark. My heart skipped a beat: Clarice Cliff transferware. Sweet!

Claric Cliff Tonquin Hallmark

Transferware is the term used for pottery or china pieces decorated by transfer printing. Not surprising, the process was developed in England in the midth century, around the Staffordshire region. Manufacturers include Enoch Wood, Royal Staffordshire, Royal Crownford, Spode, Johnson Brothers, and many more.

Hallmark for Johnson Bros.

Head HERE for a list of various, highly popular transferware patterns.

A Johnson Brothers plate

The process starts with an engraved copper plate, similar to those used by stationers for paper engravings. This copper plate imprints a pattern onto tissue paper. With the ink still wet, the printed tissue paper is laid onto the ceramic surface which transfers the image. The ceramic pieces are then fired in a kiln at low temperature which sets the pattern. It&#;s fired a second time after the glaze has been applied. Seriously, who knew?

Here&#;s the deal on this pattern:

Clarice Cliff Transferware

This service designed by Clarice Cliff for Royal Staffordshire and is called Tonquin. Other patterns include Rural Scenes, Peaceful Summer and Charlotte. Unlike this NOVELTY TEAPOT, also designed by Clarice Cliff, it was made for the masses. Love that it comes in a wide range of colours including: blue, brown, red, green, black, and the distinctive mulberry.

Close up of a large serving platter

I&#;ll go on record admitting thatI love it! My friends make fun of me for having &#;Gramma Plates&#;, but I don&#;t mind. They reflect a vintage cottage vibe, right?

Crazing in a tea cup

Here are some tips on what to look for when you start collecting transferware:

Clarice Cliff Transferware

PATTERNS

Buy a complete set of dishes. Look for a pattern that reflects your tastes. Some patterns are busier than others so pick one that works for you. Also not a bad idea to shop around. You deserve a deal!

Detail of a plate

QUANTITY

China services have a lot of pieces. Pick a pattern with lots of different pieces. Stuff like dinner, salad, dessert, and bread and butter plates. Let&#;s say it also comes with soup bowls, mugs, cups and saucers, and service pieces? Snap it up, that&#;s amazing!

Simple floral design in a fruit cup

COLOUR

If you already have a set of transferware, or a piece that you absolutely love, send us a photo to: [email protected]. I&#;ll create a little member gallery for everyone to enjoy!

Clarice Cliff Transferware &#; still stands the test of time!


Related Posts

Sours: https://weekendatthecottage.com/lifestyle/clarice-cliff-transferware/
Royal Staffordshire Dinnerware by Clarice Cliff, FRUIT Pattern SAURCEAS Plate

Tonquin Royal Staffordshire Dinnerware (with brown floral pattern) by Clarice Cliff: 48,100 ppm Lead (90 ppm & up is unsafe for kids).

XRF test results for the dish (Made in England) pictured:
60-second test

  • Lead (Pb): 48,100 +/- 1,400 ppm
  • Zinc (Zn): 5,335 +/- 183 ppm
  • Iron (Fe): 1,752 +/- 196 ppm
  • No other metals detected.

As always, thank you for reading and for sharing my posts. Please let me know if you have any questions and I will do my best to answer them personally as soon as I have a moment.

Tamara Rubin
#LeadSafeMama

Sours: https://tamararubin.com/2020/10/tonquin-royal-staffordshire-dinnerware-with-brown-floral-pattern-by-clarice-cliff-48100-ppm-lead-90-ppm-up-is-unsafe-for-kids/

Now discussing:

DINNERWARE STILL A TOUGH SELL IN THE COLLECTIBLES MARKET

Q -- I have a complete set of Tonquin pattern dinnerware marked "Royal Staffordshire." I have had these dishes for 40 years and believe they might be worth selling. I understand that Clarice Cliff is an artist in England and that this is the only set of dishes she ever designed. I would appreciate any information you can give to me. -- PO, Chesterfield, MO

A -- Howard and Pat Watson's "The Colorful World of Clarice Cliff" (Kevin Francis Publishing, ; pp., $) lists patterns designed by Clarice Cliff. Tonquin is not on that list. Why not?

Geoffrey A. Godden's "Encyclopedia of British Pottery and Porcelain Marks" (reprinted by Schiffer Publishing, ; pp., out-of-print) notes that Arthur J. Wilkinson Ltd, located in Burslem, Staffordshire, England, made Royal Staffordshire Pottery. Wilkinson manufactured several Clarice Cliff pattern lines, e.g., Bizarre, under its trademarks.

Since your question concerned dinnerware, I called Replacements Ltd. (PO Box , Greensboro, NC ) and talked with Nathan Adkins, a curator in the dinnerware section. Replacements maintains an extensive file on the Tonquin pattern, which does have a Clarice Cliff backstamp. The pattern is found with blue, black (very scarce), brown, green, multi-color, plum and red/pink transfers.

I talked next with Michael Lindsey (Lagunna, Second Ave., Seattle, WA ). Although dealing primarily in American dinnerware patterns, Michael was familiar with Tonquin. When I told him that I could not find it listed in the Clarice Cliff reference books in my library, he offered to check the reference books in his collection. He could not find any reference to it either. Since the books in our libraries were published in England, we speculated that perhaps the pattern was sold only in the American market.

I finally solved the mystery by talking with Darryl Rehr ( Military Ave., Los Angeles, CA ), who deals in Clarice Cliff art pottery, e.g., Bizarre-Ware, Fantasque and Cruise Ware, plus, oddly enough, typewriters. Darryl informed me that Tonquin was a transfer pattern featuring a Victorian scene with an oriental motif.

Serious Clarice Cliff collectors only want her art pottery designer pieces. They care little about Cliff's transfer pattern dinnerware. They consider it junk. Darryl also indicated there was a second transfer pattern featuring Victorian rural scenes.

Dennis Lockard (2 Hats Antiques, PO Box , Clarksville, VA ), a major dealer in 20th-century English dinnerware, was my final contact. He informed me that "Schroeder's Antique Price Guide, Fourteenth Edition" (Collector Books, ; pp., $) has the following in its introduction to the Clarice Cliff category: "Note: Non-hand-painted work (transfer printed) was produced after World War II and into the s. Some of the most common names are 'Tonquin' and 'Charlotte.' These items, while attractive and enjoyable to own, have no value in the collector market."

Lockard strongly disagrees. Tonquin is one of the most popular dinnerware patterns that he sells. Blue and red/pink are the two most popular colors, with blue holding a slight lead at the moment. Collectors collect Tonquin pattern dinnerware because of its large form vocabulary. The pattern has four varieties of candle holders, several table lamps, a toast holder and urn bud vase. Lockard recently found a Tonquin asparagus plate, a form rarely found in a dinnerware pattern.

Since you did not mention how large your service was, how many pieces it contained, nor its color, I am assuming it is a service for eight, is one of the common colors, and has a minimum number of serving pieces.

Your dinnerware has two values. A collector of Clarice Cliff art pottery would pay very little, a few hundred dollars, at best, for the full set.

I asked Nathan Adkins from Replacements Ltd. to quote a red/pink dinner plate ($32) and cup and saucer ($31). Lockard prices dinner plates between $18 and $ He emphatically noted that some forms sell for $ or more, e.g., the asparagus holder at $ and table lamp between $ and $

I recommend approaching Replacements Ltd. and asking them to quote what they would pay to buy your set. When contacting them, provide an exact piece count, color and a tracing of the backstamp. Expect a quote of $ to $ of the retail dollar. Also consider contacting Lockard for a second offer.

If you try to sell your set privately or at auction, you probably will realize less. Dinnerware services continue to remain a tough sell and a costly expenditure for those who need to buy individual replacement pieces.

Q -- I have a figural cookie jar of a hobo smoking a cigar that was made by Treasure Chest. Is it possible that it depicts the Brooklyn Bum? What is its value? -- SG, Allentown, PA

A -- The problem researching cookie jars is not the lack of information, but the wealth of it. I found your jar listed in five different cookie jar price guides, i.e., assuming the maker in question is Treasure Craft, not Treasure Chest. Check the markings inside your lid again.

Mike Schneider's "The Complete Cookie Jar Book" (Schiffer Publishing, ; pp., $) provides the following historical information on Treasure Craft: "Treasure Craft was founded in Gardena, Calif., in by Alfred A. Levin, and is one of the few American potteries that still produced cookie jars on a fairly large scale When Twin Winton Ceramics was sold in , Treasure Craft purchased its molds Most Treasure Craft jars are marked inside the lid Paper labels have been used, too." The Pfaltzgraff Co., York, Pa., bought the company in

Your Hobo is not the Brooklyn Bum. Ermagene Westfall's "Cookie Jars: Book II" (Collector Books, ; pp., $) identifies him as a "Hobo Clown." Schneider values the jar at $35 and Westfall lists it between $35 and $ Mark and Ellen Supnick's "The Wonderful World of Cookie Jars: A Pictorial Reference and Price Guide" (L-W Book Sales, ; pp., $) prices your jar between $95 and $ Paradise Publications' " Cookie Jar Express Price Guide To Cookie Jars" (PO Box , Mayview, OH , ; unnumbered pages, soft cover) splits the difference by listing the Treasure Craft Hobo cookie jar between $50 and $

Write to Harry Rinker in care of Rinker Collectibles, Vera Cruz Road, Emmaus, PA

Sours: https://www.mcall.com/news/mc-xpmstory.html


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